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Rehabilitating the industrial revolution

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  • MAXINE BERG
  • PAT HUDSON

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  • Maxine Berg & Pat Hudson, 1992. "Rehabilitating the industrial revolution," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 45(1), pages 24-50, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ehsrev:v:45:y:1992:i:1:p:24-50
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/j.1468-0289.1992.tb01290.x
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Hicks, J. R., 1969. "A Theory of Economic History," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198811633.
    2. Lyons, John Stephen, 1978. "The Lancashire Cotton Industry and the Introduction of the Powerloom, 1815–1850," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 38(1), pages 283-284, March.
    3. Williamson,Jeffrey G., 1990. "Coping with City Growth during the British Industrial Revolution," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521364805, April.
    4. Levine, David & Wrightson, Keith, 1991. "The Making of an Industrial Society: Whickham 1560-1765," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198200666.
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    Cited by:

    1. Moe, Espen, 2010. "Energy, industry and politics: Energy, vested interests, and long-term economic growth and development," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 35(4), pages 1730-1740.
    2. Antras, Pol & Voth, Hans-Joachim, 2003. "Factor prices and productivity growth during the British industrial revolution," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 52-77, January.
    3. Voth, Hans-Joachim, 1998. "Time and Work in Eighteenth-Century London," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 58(1), pages 29-58, March.
    4. Drusilla K. Brown & Alan V. Deardorff & Robert M. Stern, 2009. "The Effects of Multinational Production on Wages and Working Conditions in Developing Countries," World Scientific Book Chapters, in: Globalization And International Trade Policies, chapter 17, pages 623-687, World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
    5. Morgan Kelly & Cormac Ó Gráda, 2017. "Technological Dynamism in a Stagnant Sector: Safety at Sea during the Early Industrial Revolution," Working Papers 201711, School of Economics, University College Dublin.
    6. Maria Stanfors & Frances Goldscheider, 2017. "The forest and the trees: Industrialization, demographic change, and the ongoing gender revolution in Sweden and the United States, 1870-2010," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 36(6), pages 173-226.
    7. David Card & John DiNardo, 2002. "Technology and U.S. wage inequality: a brief look," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, vol. 87(Q3), pages 45-62.
    8. Bogart, Dan & Lefors, Michael & Satchell, A.E.M., 2019. "Canal carriers and creative destruction in English transport," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 71(C), pages 1-24.
    9. Christopher Dudley, 2013. "Party politics, political economy, and economic development in early eighteenth-century Britain," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 66(4), pages 1084-1100, November.
    10. Masaki Nakabayashi, 2006. "Flexibility and diversity: the putting-out system in the silk fablic industry of Kiryu, Japan," Discussion Papers in Economics and Business 06-10, Osaka University, Graduate School of Economics.
    11. Robert C. Allen, 2005. "Capital Accumulation, Technological Change, and the Distribution of Income during the British Industrial Revolution," Economics Series Working Papers 239, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    12. Alysa Levene, 2010. "Parish apprenticeship and the old poor law in London," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 63(4), pages 915-941, November.
    13. Robert Allen & Robert C. Allen, 2007. "Engel`s Pause: A Pessimist`s Guide to the British Industrial Revolution," Economics Series Working Papers 315, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    14. Sarid, Assaf & Mokyr, Joel & van der Beek, Karine, 2019. "The Wheels of Change: Human Capital, Millwrights, and Industrialization in Eighteenth-Century England," CEPR Discussion Papers 14138, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    15. Trevor Griffiths & Philip Hunt & Patrick O’Brien, 2008. "Scottish, Irish, and imperial connections: Parliament, the three kingdoms, and the mechanization of cotton spinning in eighteenth‐century Britain1," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 61(3), pages 625-650, August.
    16. Michal Mizerák, 2019. "Comparison of Transitional Theories to Post-Scarcity in Science-Fiction Literature," European Journal of Business Science and Technology, Mendel University in Brno, Faculty of Business and Economics, vol. 5(1), pages 107-123, August.
    17. Neil Rollings, 2007. "British business history: A review of the periodical literature for 2005," Business History, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(3), pages 271-292.
    18. Jane Humphries, 2013. "The lure of aggregates and the pitfalls of the patriarchal perspective: a critique of the high wage economy interpretation of the British industrial revolution," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 66(3), pages 693-714, August.
    19. Peter Maw, 2010. "Yorkshire and Lancashire ascendant: England's textile exports to New York and Philadelphia, 1750–1805," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 63(3), pages 734-768, August.
    20. Morgan Kelly & Cormac Ó Gráda, 2017. "Speed under Sail, 1750–1830," Working Papers 201710, School of Economics, University College Dublin.
    21. Helen Paul, 2015. "Editorial: Women in economic and social history: twenty-fifth anniversary of the Women's Committee of the Economic History Society," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 68(2), pages 1-17, May.
    22. Mohajan, Haradhan, 2019. "The First Industrial Revolution: Creation of a New Global Human Era," MPRA Paper 96644, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 17 Jul 2019.

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