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New Perspectives on Institutionalist Pattern Modeling: Systemism, Complexity, and Agent-Based Modeling

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  • Gräbner, Claudius
  • Kapeller, Jakop

Abstract

This paper focuses on the complementarity between original institutional economics, Mario Bunge’s framework of systemism, and the formal tools developed by complexity economists, especially in the context of agent-based modeling. Thereby, we assert that original institutional economics might profit from exploiting this complementarity.

Suggested Citation

  • Gräbner, Claudius & Kapeller, Jakop, 2015. "New Perspectives on Institutionalist Pattern Modeling: Systemism, Complexity, and Agent-Based Modeling," MPRA Paper 77334, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:77334
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Manuel Wäckerle & Bernhard Rengs & Wolfgang Radax, 2014. "An Agent-Based Model of Institutional Life-Cycles," Games, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 5(3), pages 1-28, August.
    2. G. Hodgson., 2007. "What Are Institutions?," VOPROSY ECONOMIKI, N.P. Redaktsiya zhurnala "Voprosy Economiki", vol. 8.
    3. Elsner, Wolfram & Heinrich, Torsten, 2009. "A simple theory of 'meso'. On the co-evolution of institutions and platform size--With an application to varieties of capitalism and 'medium-sized' countries," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 38(5), pages 843-858, October.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Walter, Timo & Wansleben, Leon, 2019. "The assault of finance’s ‘present futures’ on the rest of time," SocArXiv 8dyq2, Center for Open Science.
    2. Leigh Tesfatsion, 2017. "Modeling economic systems as locally-constructive sequential games," Journal of Economic Methodology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 24(4), pages 384-409, October.
    3. Claudius Gräbner & Catherine S. E. Bale & Bernardo Alves Furtado & Brais Alvarez-Pereira & James E. Gentile & Heath Henderson & Francesca Lipari, 2019. "Getting the Best of Both Worlds? Developing Complementary Equation-Based and Agent-Based Models," Computational Economics, Springer;Society for Computational Economics, vol. 53(2), pages 763-782, February.
    4. Gräbner, Claudius, 2016. "From realism to instrumentalism - and back? Methodological implications of changes in the epistemology of economics," MPRA Paper 71933, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Heinrich, Torsten, 2016. "The Narrow and the Broad Approach to Evolutionary Modeling in Economics," MPRA Paper 75797, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Claudius Gräbner, 2017. "The Complementary Relationship Between Institutional and Complexity Economics: The Example of Deep Mechanismic Explanations," Journal of Economic Issues, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 51(2), pages 392-400, April.
    7. Tesfatsion, Leigh, 2017. "Modeling Economic Systems as Locally-Constructive Sequential Games," ISU General Staff Papers 201704300700001022, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    8. Katrin Hirte, 2020. "Friedman's Instrumentalismus und das Problem von Kopernikus," ICAE Working Papers 114, Johannes Kepler University, Institute for Comprehensive Analysis of the Economy.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Aggregation; Original Institutionalism; Systemism; Agent-Based Computational Economics; Complexity;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • B41 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - Economic Methodology - - - Economic Methodology
    • B52 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - Current Heterodox Approaches - - - Historical; Institutional; Evolutionary; Modern Monetary Theory;
    • C63 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Computational Techniques

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