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The Road to Gender Equality: Global Trends and the Way Forward


  • Seguino, Stephanie


International organizations have expressed widespread agreement that gender equality is an important social and economic goal. Well-being is a multidimensional measure of material status and encompasses income, health, education, empowerment, relative economic and social status, and security, although precise definitions and emphases on the individual components vary. Since the early 1980s, a number of international agencies have produced analyses of gendered trends in well-being. This paper compares and critically assesses the contribution of some of these studies to understanding the state of gender equality and the causal mechanisms that inhibit or promote such a goal.

Suggested Citation

  • Seguino, Stephanie, 2006. "The Road to Gender Equality: Global Trends and the Way Forward," MPRA Paper 6510, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:6510

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Seguino, Stephanie, 2007. "Is more mobility good?: Firm mobility and the low wage-low productivity trap," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 27-51, March.
    2. Sandra E. Black & Elizabeth Brainerd, 2004. "Importing Equality? The Impact of Globalization on Gender Discrimination," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 57(4), pages 540-559, July.
    3. Gunseli Berik, 2000. "Mature Export-Led Growth and Gender Wage Inequality in Taiwan," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 6(3), pages 1-26.
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    6. Elson, Diane & Cagatay, Nilufer, 2000. "The Social Content of Macroeconomic Policies," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 28(7), pages 1347-1364, July.
    7. Singh, Ajit & Zammit, Ann, 2000. "The global labour standards controversy: critical issues for developing countries," MPRA Paper 53480, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Martha Nussbaum, 2003. "Capabilities As Fundamental Entitlements: Sen And Social Justice," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 9(2-3), pages 33-59.
    9. Stephen Knowles & Paula K. Lorgelly, 2002. "Are educational gender gaps a brake on economic development? Some cross-country empirical evidence," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 54(1), pages 118-149, January.
    10. Frank Barry & Holger Gorg & Eric Strobl, 2005. "Foreign direct investment and wages in domestic firms in Ireland: Productivity spillovers versus labour-market crowding out," International Journal of the Economics of Business, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(1), pages 67-84.
    11. Christian Morrisson & Johannes P. J├╝tting, 2004. "The Impact of Social Institutions on the Economic Role of Women in Developing Countries," OECD Development Centre Working Papers 234, OECD Publishing.
    12. Stephan Klasen & Claudia Wink, 2003. ""Missing Women": Revisiting The Debate," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 9(2-3), pages 263-299.
    13. Bharati Basu & Felix Famoye, 2004. "Domestic violence against women, and their economic dependence: A count data analysis," Review of Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(4), pages 457-472.
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    Cited by:

    1. Emara Noha M.F., 2014. "Income Elasticity and the Gender Gap: A Challenging MDG for the MENA Countries," Review of Middle East Economics and Finance, De Gruyter, vol. 10(3), pages 1-29, December.

    More about this item


    gender inequality; globalization; World Bank; United Nations; well-being; indicators;

    JEL classification:

    • O1 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination


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