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Democracy, cognitive skill, and top 1% income share in the 21st century

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  • Yamamura, Eiji

Abstract

Studies to date have shown that income concentration for the top 1% income share, the super-rich, has increased conspicuously in the 21st century. However, there is insufficient knowledge on how political factors and types of human capital influence income concentration. Using cross-country data from this century, I provide empirical evidence that shows that democracy and cognitive skill are negatively correlated to the top 1% income share.

Suggested Citation

  • Yamamura, Eiji, 2015. "Democracy, cognitive skill, and top 1% income share in the 21st century," MPRA Paper 64194, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:64194
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Christian Morrisson & Fabrice Murtin, 2009. "The Century of Education," Journal of Human Capital, University of Chicago Press, vol. 3(1), pages 1-42.
    2. Daron Acemoglu & James A. Robinson, 2000. "Why Did the West Extend the Franchise? Democracy, Inequality, and Growth in Historical Perspective," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 115(4), pages 1167-1199.
    3. Atkinson, A. B. & Piketty, Thomas (ed.), 2007. "Top Incomes Over the Twentieth Century: A Contrast Between Continental European and English-Speaking Countries," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199286881.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Democracy; Cognitive skill; Top 1% income share;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I24 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Inequality
    • P16 - Economic Systems - - Capitalist Systems - - - Political Economy of Capitalism

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