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On the Extent to which the Presence of Intermediate-stop(s) Air Travel Products Influences the Pricing of Nonstop Air Travel Products

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  • Gayle, Philip
  • Wu, Chi-Yin

Abstract

Analysts of air travel markets, which include antitrust authorities, are interested in understanding the extent to which the presence of intermediate stop(s) products influences the pricing of nonstop products. This paper uses a structural econometric model to investigate the potential pricing interdependence between these two product types in domestic air travel markets. Counterfactual experiments using the estimated model suggest that in many (but far from a majority) markets the current prices of nonstop products are at least 5% lower than they would otherwise be owing to the presence of intermediate-stop(s) products.

Suggested Citation

  • Gayle, Philip & Wu, Chi-Yin, 2015. "On the Extent to which the Presence of Intermediate-stop(s) Air Travel Products Influences the Pricing of Nonstop Air Travel Products," MPRA Paper 64190, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:64190
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    Cited by:

    1. Pagoni, Ioanna & Psaraki-Kalouptsidi, Voula, 2016. "The impact of carbon emission fees on passenger demand and air fares: A game theoretic approach," Journal of Air Transport Management, Elsevier, vol. 55(C), pages 41-51.
    2. Gayle, Philip & Lin, Ying, 2020. "Cost Pass-through in Commercial Aviation: Theory and Evidence," MPRA Paper 102018, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Philip G. Gayle & Xin Xie, 2018. "Entry Deterrence And Strategic Alliances," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 56(3), pages 1898-1924, July.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Substitutability and Pricing Interdependence between Differentiated Air Travel Products; Discrete Choice Demand Model; Random Coefficients Logit;

    JEL classification:

    • L13 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - Oligopoly and Other Imperfect Markets
    • L40 - Industrial Organization - - Antitrust Issues and Policies - - - General
    • L93 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Transportation and Utilities - - - Air Transportation

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