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Heterogeneous labor demand: sectoral elasticity and trade effects in the U.S., Germany and Sweden

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  • Judzik, Dario

Abstract

This paper analyzes labor demand at the sector level in the U.S., Germany and Sweden in two ways: by providing new computations of the sector elasticity of labor demand, and by evaluating the employment effects of trade in manufactures, services, agriculture and fuel. The elasticity is computed through a standard fixedeffects model and then by taking a semi-pooling sector-level approach (i.e., by flexibilizing the coefficient homogeneity assumption). Most sector-level elasticities differ largely from the aggregate estimate in all three countries. The employment effect of openness to trade is generally positive, although it varies according to country particularities. The employment effect of technical change may help in understanding Germany’s remarkable employment performance over the last decade.

Suggested Citation

  • Judzik, Dario, 2014. "Heterogeneous labor demand: sectoral elasticity and trade effects in the U.S., Germany and Sweden," MPRA Paper 62768, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:62768
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/62768/1/MPRA_paper_62768.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    sector-level; labor demand; elasticity; wage; trade; technical change;

    JEL classification:

    • E60 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - General
    • F16 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade and Labor Market Interactions
    • J23 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Demand
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes

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