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Comparing U.S. and European Market Volatility Responses to Interest Rate Policy Announcements

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  • Krieger, Kevin
  • Mauck, Nathan
  • Vasquez, Joseph

Abstract

We examine the response of U.S. (VIX) and German (VDAX) implied volatility indices to the announcement of interest rate policy decisions by the Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) and the European Central Bank (ECB). We confirm prior findings that VIX declines on FOMC meetings days. We present new findings that indicate that VDAX declines on FOMC meeting days, but is not related to ECB meeting days. VIX is unrelated to ECB meeting days. Taken collectively, our results indicate a prominent position for the FOMC in determining uncertainty levels both domestically and abroad relative to no relation between uncertainty levels and the ECB. JEL

Suggested Citation

  • Krieger, Kevin & Mauck, Nathan & Vasquez, Joseph, 2014. "Comparing U.S. and European Market Volatility Responses to Interest Rate Policy Announcements," MPRA Paper 52959, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:52959
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Camilleri, Silvio John & Scicluna, Nicolanne & Bai, Ye, 2019. "Do stock markets lead or lag macroeconomic variables? Evidence from select European countries," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 170-186.
    2. repec:eee:intfin:v:58:y:2019:i:c:p:117-135 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Nave, Juan M. & Ruiz, Javier, 2015. "Risk aversion and monetary policy in a global context," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 20(C), pages 14-35.
    4. Vortelinos, Dimitrios I., 2015. "Out-of-sample evaluation of macro announcements, linearity, long memory, heterogeneity and jumps in mini-futures markets," Review of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(C), pages 58-67.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    FOMC; ECB; VIX; VDAX; Monetary policy; Volatility spillover;

    JEL classification:

    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies
    • F3 - International Economics - - International Finance
    • F62 - International Economics - - Economic Impacts of Globalization - - - Macroeconomic Impacts
    • G20 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - General
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • G28 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Government Policy and Regulation

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