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Asymmetric effects of federal funds target rate changes on S&P100 stock returns, volatilities and correlations

  • Chuliá, Helena
  • Martens, Martin
  • Dijk, Dick van

We study the effects of FOMC announcements of federal funds target rate decisions on individual stock returns, volatilities and correlations at the intraday level. For all three characteristics we find that the stock market responds differently to positive and negative target rate surprises. First, the average response to positive surprises (that is, bad news for stocks) is larger. Second, in case of bad news the mere occurrence of a surprise matters most, whereas for good news its magnitude is more important. These new insights are possible due to the use of high-frequency intraday data.

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File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378-4266(09)00245-3
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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Banking & Finance.

Volume (Year): 34 (2010)
Issue (Month): 4 (April)
Pages: 834-839

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Handle: RePEc:eee:jbfina:v:34:y:2010:i:4:p:834-839
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jbf

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