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What moves the bond market?

  • Michael J. Fleming
  • Eli M. Remolona

In an examination of the U.S. Treasury securities market, the authors attempt to explain the sharpest price changes and most active trading episodes. They find that each of the twenty-five largest price shocks and twenty-five greatest trading surges can be attributed to just-released macroeconomic announcements. They also measure the market's average reactions to theses announcements and analyze the extent to which the reactions depend on the degree of announcement surprise and on prevailing market conditions. The market's price and trading reactions are found to reflect differences of informational content in and among the varying announcements under changing market conditions.

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Article provided by Federal Reserve Bank of New York in its journal Economic Policy Review.

Volume (Year): (1997)
Issue (Month): Dec ()
Pages: 31-50

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Handle: RePEc:fip:fednep:y:1997:i:dec:p:31-50:n:v.3no.4
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  1. V. Vance Roley & Rick Troll, 1983. "The impact of new economic information on the volatility of short-term interest rates," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, issue Feb, pages 3-15.
  2. Cornell, Bradford, 1983. "The Money Supply Announcements Puzzle: Review and Interpretation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 73(4), pages 644-57, September.
  3. Roley, V Vance & Walsh, Carl E, 1985. "Monetary Policy Regimes, Expected Inflation, and the Response of Interest Rates to Money Announcements," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 100(5), pages 1011-39, Supp..
  4. Urich, Thomas J & Wachtel, Paul, 1984. " The Effects of Inflation and Money Supply Announcements on Interest Rates," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 39(4), pages 1177-88, September.
  5. Michael Smirlock, 1986. "Inflation announcements and financial market reaction: evidence from the long-term bond market," Working Papers 86-6, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
  6. Ederington, Louis H & Lee, Jae Ha, 1993. " How Markets Process Information: News Releases and Volatility," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 48(4), pages 1161-91, September.
  7. Timothy Cook & Steven Korn, 1991. "The reaction of interest rates to the employment report: the role of policy anticipations," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, issue Sep, pages 3-12.
  8. V. Vance Roley, 1982. "Weekly money supply announcements and the volatility of short-term interest rates," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, issue Apr, pages 3-15.
  9. French, Kenneth R. & Roll, Richard, 1986. "Stock return variances : The arrival of information and the reaction of traders," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(1), pages 5-26, September.
  10. Hardouvelis, Gikas A., 1988. "Economic news, exchange rates and interest rates," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 7(1), pages 23-35, March.
  11. Edison, Hali J, 1997. "The Reaction of Exchange Rates and Interest Rates to News Releases," International Journal of Finance & Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 2(2), pages 87-100, April.
  12. Pearce, Douglas K & Roley, V Vance, 1985. "Stock Prices and Economic News," The Journal of Business, University of Chicago Press, vol. 58(1), pages 49-67, January.
  13. Hardouvelis, Gikas A., 1987. "Macroeconomic information and stock prices," Journal of Economics and Business, Elsevier, vol. 39(2), pages 131-140, May.
  14. V. Vance Roley, 1982. "The Response of Short-Term Interest Rates to Weekly Money Announcements," NBER Working Papers 1001, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  15. David H. Cutler & James M. Poterba & Lawrence H. Summers, 1988. "What Moves Stock Prices?," Working papers 487, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Department of Economics.
  16. Alan Krueger, 1996. "Do Markets Respond More To More Reliable Labor Market Data? A Test of Market Rationality," Working Papers 746, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
  17. Michael J. Fleming, 1997. "The round-the-clock market for U.S. Treasury securities," Economic Policy Review, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, issue Jul, pages 9-32.
  18. Clark, Peter K, 1973. "A Subordinated Stochastic Process Model with Finite Variance for Speculative Prices," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 41(1), pages 135-55, January.
  19. Tauchen, George E & Pitts, Mark, 1983. "The Price Variability-Volume Relationship on Speculative Markets," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 51(2), pages 485-505, March.
  20. Thomas Urich & Paul Wachtel, 1984. "The Effects of Inflation and Money Supply Announcements on Interest Rates," NBER Working Papers 1313, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  21. Jain, Prem C, 1988. "Response of Hourly Stock Prices and Trading Volume to Economic News," The Journal of Business, University of Chicago Press, vol. 61(2), pages 219-31, April.
  22. Andersen, Torben G, 1996. " Return Volatility and Trading Volume: An Information Flow Interpretation of Stochastic Volatility," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 51(1), pages 169-204, March.
  23. Roley, V Vance, 1983. "The Response of Short-Term Interest Rates to Weekly Money Announcements," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 15(3), pages 344-54, August.
  24. Strongin, Steven & Tarhan, Vefa, 1990. "Money Supply Announcements and the Market's Perception of Federal Reserve Policy," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 22(2), pages 135-53, May.
  25. Smirlock, Michael, 1986. "Inflation Announcements and Financial Market Reaction: Evidence from the Long-term Bond Market," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 68(2), pages 329-33, May.
  26. Gerald P. Dwyer, Jr. & R.W. Hafer, 1989. "Interest rates and economic announcements," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue Mar, pages 34-46.
  27. Schwert, G William, 1981. "The Adjustment of Stock Prices to Information about Inflation," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 36(1), pages 15-29, March.
  28. Steven Strongin & Vefa Tarhan, 1990. "Money supply announcements and the market's perception of Federal Reserve policy," Working Paper Series, Macroeconomic Issues 90-3, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
  29. Michael J. Fleming & Eli M. Remolona, 1997. "Price formation and liquidity in the U.S. Treasury market: evidence from intraday patterns around announcements," Staff Reports 27, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
  30. Thornton, Daniel L., 1989. "The effect of unanticipated money on the money and foreign exchange markets," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 8(4), pages 573-587, December.
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