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Financial liberalisation, Banking Crises and Economic Growth in African Countries

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  • Enowbi Batuo, Michael
  • Mlambo, Kupukile

Abstract

While financial liberalisation is considered to be good for economic growth in that it promotes the development of the financial sector, banking crises on the other hand tend to be inimical for economic growth. Moreover, banking crises tend to be preceded by financial liberalisation, as noted in a number of studies. This is because financial liberalisation tends to induce greater risk-taking behaviour by agents, thus leading to banking crises. In this paper we study the effect of financial liberalisation and banking crises on the economic performance of African countries during the period covering 1985 to 2010. Using a treatment effect, two step methods and a panel probit method, our results show that banking crises have a negative impact on economic growth meanwhile financial liberalisation tends to reduce the likelihood of banking crises in African countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Enowbi Batuo, Michael & Mlambo, Kupukile, 2012. "Financial liberalisation, Banking Crises and Economic Growth in African Countries," MPRA Paper 41524, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:41524
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/41524/1/MPRA_paper_41524.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Aaron Tornell & Frank Westermann & Lorenza Martinez, 2004. "The Positive Link Between Financial Liberalization Growth and Crises," UCLA Economics Working Papers 834, UCLA Department of Economics.
    2. La Porta, Rafael & Florencio Lopez-de-Silanes & Andrei Shleifer & Robert W. Vishny, 1997. " Legal Determinants of External Finance," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 52(3), pages 1131-1150, July.
    3. Carmen M. Reinhart & Ioannis Tokatlidis, 2003. "Financial Liberalisation: The African Experience," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 12(Supplemen), pages 53-88, September.
    4. Daniel, Betty C. & Jones, John Bailey, 2007. "Financial liberalization and banking crises in emerging economies," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 72(1), pages 202-221, May.
    5. Rafael La Porta & Florencio Lopez-de-Silanes & Andrei Shleifer & Robert W. Vishny, 1998. "Law and Finance," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 106(6), pages 1113-1155, December.
    6. Peter Blair Henry, 2000. "Stock Market Liberalization, Economic Reform, and Emerging Market Equity Prices," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 55(2), pages 529-564, April.
    7. repec:hrv:faseco:30728041 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Levine, Ross, 2001. "International Financial Liberalization and Economic Growth," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 9(4), pages 688-702, November.
    9. Fabian Valencia & Luc Laeven, 2008. "Systemic Banking Crises; A New Database," IMF Working Papers 08/224, International Monetary Fund.
    10. Donald S. Allen & Leonce Ndikumana, 1998. "Financial intermediation and economic growth in southern Africa," Working Papers 1998-004, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
    11. Kevin C. Murdock & Thomas F. Hellmann & Joseph E. Stiglitz, 2000. "Liberalization, Moral Hazard in Banking, and Prudential Regulation: Are Capital Requirements Enough?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(1), pages 147-165, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Dandume, Muhammad Yusuf & A.C., Dr.Malarvizhi, 2014. "Does Financial Liberalization, Spur Economic Growth and Poverty Reduction in Six Sub-Saharan African Countries; Panel Unit Root and Panel Vector Error Correction Tests," MPRA Paper 52349, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Aug 2013.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    O16; O47; G23; O55;

    JEL classification:

    • O16 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Financial Markets; Saving and Capital Investment; Corporate Finance and Governance
    • N17 - Economic History - - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics; Industrial Structure; Growth; Fluctuations - - - Africa; Oceania
    • O4 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity

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