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Financial Contagion and Systemic Risk: From Theory to Applicable Macroeconomic Model

This draft working paper is to summarize theoretical contributions in the field of measuring systemic risk and contagion of financial systems. Broad theoretical framework is analyzed and empiric approach to a macroeconomic model of global banking system systemic risk and contagion is offered. The model is to use BIS locational statistics as well as national consolidated balance sheets of banking systems to provide some insight into the vulnerability of modern banking system. As to theoretical contributions, three branches of literature are analyzed: correlation-based measures, network-based measures and various systemic risk measures.

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File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/40612/1/MPRA_paper_40612.pdf
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Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 40612.

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Date of creation: 14 Jun 2012
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:40612
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  1. Billio, Monica & Caporin, Massimiliano, 2010. "Market linkages, variance spillovers, and correlation stability: Empirical evidence of financial contagion," Computational Statistics & Data Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 54(11), pages 2443-2458, November.
  2. Corsetti, Giancarlo & Pericoli, Marcello & Sbracia, Massimo, 2002. "Some Contagion, Some Interdependence: More Pitfalls in Tests of Financial Contagion," CEPR Discussion Papers 3310, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  3. Stefanie Kleimeier & Thorsten Lehnert & Willem F. C. Verschoor, 2008. "Measuring Financial Contagion Using Time-Aligned Data: The Importance of the Speed of Transmission of Shocks," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 70(4), pages 493-508, 08.
  4. Kannan, Prakash & Kohler-Geib, Fritzi, 2009. "The uncertainty channel of contagion," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4995, The World Bank.
  5. Nier, Erlend & Yang, Jing & Yorulmazer, Tanju & Alentorn, Amadeo, 2007. "Network models and financial stability," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 31(6), pages 2033-2060, June.
  6. Mikhail Stolbov, 2014. "International Credit Cycles: A Regional Perspective," Economic Studies journal, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences - Economic Research Institute, issue 1, pages 21-47.
  7. Ostrup, Finn & Oxelheim, Lars & Wihlborg, Clas, 2009. "Origins and Resolution of Financial Crises; Lessons from the Current and Northern European Crises," Working Paper Series 796, Research Institute of Industrial Economics.
  8. Giorgio Fagiolo & Javier Reyes & Stefano Schiavo, 2007. "The Evolution of the World Trade Web," LEM Papers Series 2007/17, Laboratory of Economics and Management (LEM), Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies, Pisa, Italy.
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