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Product differentiation and systematic risk: theory and empirical evidence

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  • Bazdresch, Santiago

Abstract

Firms producing differentiated products have high margins and therefore low risk. As a result firms invest more into developing differentiated products when they perceive risk is high. Higher risk also implies higher product skewness towards more differentiated products and therefore higher average markups. The model predicts endogenous systematic and idiosyncratic riskiness as well as endogenous intensity of competition: firms in high risk industries reduce their riskiness by competing less than firms in low risk industries. Empirical evidence on product differentiation, R\&D expenses, B/M ratios, and market $\beta$ is consistent with the model.

Suggested Citation

  • Bazdresch, Santiago, 2011. "Product differentiation and systematic risk: theory and empirical evidence," MPRA Paper 35504, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 01 Nov 2011.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:35504
    as

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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/35504/1/MPRA_paper_35504.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. repec:eee:pacfin:v:46:y:2017:i:pb:p:292-308 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Stock Returns; Price Differentiation; Product Market Competition; Product Development; Idiosyncratic Volatility; Research and Development; Counter-Cyclical Markups; Price of Risk; Price-Cost Margin; Investment; Innovation;

    JEL classification:

    • L25 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - Firm Performance
    • L16 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - Industrial Organization and Macroeconomics; Macroeconomic Industrial Structure
    • L11 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - Production, Pricing, and Market Structure; Size Distribution of Firms
    • G12 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Asset Pricing; Trading Volume; Bond Interest Rates
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E22 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Investment; Capital; Intangible Capital; Capacity
    • G32 - Financial Economics - - Corporate Finance and Governance - - - Financing Policy; Financial Risk and Risk Management; Capital and Ownership Structure; Value of Firms; Goodwill
    • O31 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Innovation and Invention: Processes and Incentives

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