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High Idiosyncratic Volatility and Low Returns: International and Further U.S. Evidence

  • Andrew Ang
  • Robert J. Hodrick
  • Yuhang Xing
  • Xiaoyan Zhang

Stocks with recent past high idiosyncratic volatility have low future average returns around the world. Across 23 developed markets, the difference in average returns between the extreme quintile portfolios sorted on idiosyncratic volatility is -1.31% per month, after controlling for world market, size, and value factors. The effect is individually significant in each G7 country. In the U.S., we rule out explanations based on trading frictions, information dissemination, and higher moments. There is strong comovement in the low returns to high idiosyncratic volatility stocks across countries, suggesting that broad, not easily diversifiable, factors may lie behind this phenomenon.

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Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 13739.

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Date of creation: Jan 2008
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Publication status: published as Ang, Andrew & Hodrick, Robert J. & Xing, Yuhang & Zhang, Xiaoyan, 2009. "High idiosyncratic volatility and low returns: International and further U.S. evidence," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 91(1), pages 1-23, January.
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:13739
Note: AP
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