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Fiscal Policy and Current Account Dynamics in Case of Pakistan

Author

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  • Javid, Attiya Y.
  • Javid, Muhammad
  • Arif, Umaima

Abstract

The study empirically investigates the effects of fiscal policy or government budget deficit shocks on the current account and the other macroeconomic variable: real output, real interest rate and exchange rate for Pakistan over the period 1960-2009. The structural Vector Autoregressive model is employed; the exogenous fiscal policy shocks are identified after controlling the business cycle effects on fiscal balances. The results suggest that an expansionary fiscal policy shock improves the current account and depreciates the exchange rate. The rise in private saving and the fall in investment contribute to the current account improvement while the exchange rate depreciation. The twin divergence of fiscal deficit and current account deficit is also explained by the output shock which seems to drive the current account movements and its comovements with the fiscal balance.

Suggested Citation

  • Javid, Attiya Y. & Javid, Muhammad & Arif, Umaima, 2011. "Fiscal Policy and Current Account Dynamics in Case of Pakistan," MPRA Paper 34858, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:34858
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/34858/1/MPRA_paper_34858.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Stephen M. Miller & Frank S. Russek, 1989. "Are The Twin Deficits Really Related?," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 7(4), pages 91-115, October.
    2. Barro, Robert J, 1981. "Output Effects of Government Purchases," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 89(6), pages 1086-1121, December.
    3. Anjum Aqeel & Mohammed Nishat, 2000. "The Twin Deficits Phenomenon: Evidence from Pakistan," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 39(4), pages 535-550.
    4. Obstfeld, Maurice & Rogoff, Kenneth, 1995. "Exchange Rate Dynamics Redux," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 103(3), pages 624-660, June.
    5. Giancarlo Corsetti & Gernot J. Müller, 2006. "Twin deficits: squaring theory, evidence and common sense," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 21(48), pages 597-638, October.
    6. Olivier Blanchard & Roberto Perotti, 2002. "An Empirical Characterization of the Dynamic Effects of Changes in Government Spending and Taxes on Output," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 117(4), pages 1329-1368.
    7. Backus, David K & Kehoe, Patrick J & Kydland, Finn E, 1992. "International Real Business Cycles," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 100(4), pages 745-775, August.
    8. Kim, Soyoung & Roubini, Nouriel, 2008. "Twin deficit or twin divergence? Fiscal policy, current account, and real exchange rate in the U.S," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 74(2), pages 362-383, March.
    9. S M Ali Abbas & Jacques Bouhga-Hagbe & Antonio Fatás & Paolo Mauro & Ricardo C Velloso, 2011. "Fiscal Policy and the Current Account," IMF Economic Review, Palgrave Macmillan;International Monetary Fund, vol. 59(4), pages 603-629, November.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Rajmund Mirdala, 2013. "Fiscal Imbalances and Current Account Adjustments in the European Transition Economies," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series wp1065, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
    2. Mumtaz, Kinza & Munir, Kashif, 2016. "Dynamics of Twin Deficits in South Asian Countries," MPRA Paper 74592, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Restricted Vector Autoregressive model; current account; government budget deficit; fiscal policy; exchange rate;

    JEL classification:

    • E62 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Fiscal Policy
    • E61 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Policy Objectives; Policy Designs and Consistency; Policy Coordination

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