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Productivity Growth in Food Crop Production in Imo State, Nigeria

Author

Listed:
  • Onyenweaku, C.E
  • Nwachukwu, Ifeanyi N.
  • Opara, T.C.

Abstract

The study examined the productivity growth in food crop production in Imo State with emphasis on the decomposition of total factor productivity into technical progress, changes in technical and allocative efficiency and scale effects. A panel data set comprising 210 observations drawn over 2001 – 2007 periods was used in the study. Using the translog stochastic frontier production function, the decomposition components were computed applying the appropriate formulae. The results showed that total factor productivity decreased through time while technical change was negative, implying downward shift of the production frontier. As a major component, technical change was the main constraint to the achievement of high levels of TFP during the study period. The scale effect, which is generally bigger than technical change component shows that the sampled farms on the average have not taken advantage of scale economies. The result further revealed that the allocative efficiency had an average magnitude closer to the scale effect and points towards decreases in the efficiency with which production factors are allocated. This is an indication of a decline in technical efficiency. On the basis of the results, the study suggested reforms of the ADPs with a bid to enhancing their capacity in extending novel technologies and innovations to farmers.

Suggested Citation

  • Onyenweaku, C.E & Nwachukwu, Ifeanyi N. & Opara, T.C., 2010. "Productivity Growth in Food Crop Production in Imo State, Nigeria," MPRA Paper 29538, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 02 May 2010.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:29538
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Nwachukwu, Ifeanyi Ndubuto & Onyenweaku, Chris/E, 2007. "Economic Efficiency Of Fadama Telfairia Production In Imo State Nigeria: A Translog Profit Function Approach," MPRA Paper 13469, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Ogunyinka, Ebenezer & Langemeier, Michael R., 2004. "Examining Cross-Country Agricultural Productivity Differences," 2004 Annual Meeting, February 14-18, 2004, Tulsa, Oklahoma 34620, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.
    3. Kumbhakar, Subal C., 1990. "Production frontiers, panel data, and time-varying technical inefficiency," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 46(1-2), pages 201-211.
    4. Guy Nkamleu, 2004. "Productivity Growth, Technical Progress and Efficiency Change in African Agriculture," African Development Review, African Development Bank, vol. 16(1), pages 203-222.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Productivity decomposition; scale effect; allocative; efficiency;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C13 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Estimation: General
    • C42 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods: Special Topics - - - Survey Methods
    • D01 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Microeconomic Behavior: Underlying Principles
    • B41 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - Economic Methodology - - - Economic Methodology

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