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An Empirical Analysis of the Effects of GP Competition

  • Pike, Chris
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    We analyse the relationship between the quality of a GP practice in England and the degree of competition that it faces (as indicated by the number of nearby rival GP practices). We find that those GP practices that are located close to other rival GP practices provide a higher quality of care than that provided by GP practices that lack competitors. This higher level of quality is observed firstly in an indicator of clinical quality (referrals to secondary care for conditions that are treatable within primary care), and secondly in an indicator of patient observed quality (patient satisfaction scores obtained from the national GP patient survey). The association between increased competition and higher quality is found for GP practices located within 500 metres of each other. However it would appear that the magnitude and geographic scope of the relationship are constrained by restrictions upon patient choice. As a result the findings presented here may only reflect a fraction of the potential benefits to patients from increased choice and competition.

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    File URL: http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/27613/1/MPRA_paper_27613.pdf
    File Function: original version
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    Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 27613.

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    Date of creation: 01 Aug 2010
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    Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:27613
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    Web page: http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de

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    1. Zack Cooper & Stephen Gibbons & Simon Jones & Alistair McGuire, 2010. "Does hospital competition save lives?: evidence from the English NHS patient choice reforms," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 28584, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    2. Hugh Gravelle & Stephen Morris & Matt Sutton, 2006. "Are General Practitioners Good for Endogenous Supply and Health," Working Papers 020cherp, Centre for Health Economics, University of York.
    3. Martin Gaynor & Rodrigo Moreno-Serra & Carol Propper, 2013. "Death by Market Power: Reform, Competition, and Patient Outcomes in the National Health Service," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 5(4), pages 134-66, November.
    4. Nicholas Bloom & Carol Propper & Stephan Seiler & John van Reenan, 2010. "The Impact of Competition on Management Quality: Evidence from Public Hospitals," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 10/237, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
    5. Hugh Gravelle & Matt Sutton & Ada Ma, 2010. "Doctor Behaviour under a Pay for Performance Contract: Treating, Cheating and Case Finding?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 120(542), pages F129-F156, 02.
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