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Industrialization and the role of government

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  • Takeuchi, Nobuyuki

Abstract

We construct a two-sector endogenous growth model to examine the role of government in industrialization. Three main features of this model are (a) household preference is non-homothetic; (b) government’s sector-specific spending is introduced as a production factor and (c) technological progress occurs only in the manufacturing sector through learning-by-doing. By using the model with these features, we derive the optimal policy for government resource allocation, optimal tax rate and share of government spending for each sector, to maximize the household’s utility. In addition, we examine the dynamics of the model. The model reveals that (a) increments in both agricultural productivity and manufacturing productivity cause labour to move from the agricultural sector to the manufacturing sector; (b) depending on the relative elasticity of production with respect to government’s spending between the two sectors, the optimal tax rate will shrink or expand with the passage of time and will stay at a level of balanced growth path in the long run and (c) as the industrialization progresses, the optimal share of government spending for the agricultural sector will decline.

Suggested Citation

  • Takeuchi, Nobuyuki, 2010. "Industrialization and the role of government," MPRA Paper 26822, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:26822
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Romer, Paul M, 1986. "Increasing Returns and Long-run Growth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 94(5), pages 1002-1037, October.
    2. Piyabha Kongsamut & Sergio Rebelo & Danyang Xie, 2001. "Beyond Balanced Growth," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 68(4), pages 869-882.
    3. Jonathan Temple, 2005. "Dual Economy Models: A Primer For Growth Economists," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 73(4), pages 435-478, July.
    4. Barro, Robert J, 1990. "Government Spending in a Simple Model of Endogenous Growth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 98(5), pages 103-126, October.
    5. Jing Jun Chang & Been-Lon Chen & Mei Hsu, 2006. "Agricultural Productivity and Economic Growth: Role of Tax Revenues and Infrastructures," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 72(4), pages 891-914, April.
    6. Eswaran, Mukesh & Kotwal, Ashok, 1993. "A theory of real wage growth in LDCs," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(2), pages 243-269, December.
    7. Turnovsky, Stephen J., 1997. "Fiscal Policy In A Growing Economy With Public Capital," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 1(03), pages 615-639, September.
    8. Echevarria, Cristina, 1997. "Changes in Sectoral Composition Associated with Economic Growth," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 38(2), pages 431-452, May.
    9. Kanbur, S M Ravi & McIntosh, James P, 1988. "Dual Economy Models: Retrospect and Prospect," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 40(2), pages 83-113, April.
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    12. Futagami, Koichi & Morita, Yuichi & Shibata, Akihisa, 1993. " Dynamic Analysis of an Endogenous Growth Model with Public Capital," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 95(4), pages 607-625, December.
    13. Sato, Ryuzo & Niho, Yoshio, 1971. "Population Growth and the Development of a Dual Economy," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 23(3), pages 418-436, November.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    industrialization; productive government spending; learning-by-doing; economic growth;

    JEL classification:

    • O11 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Macroeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • O41 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - One, Two, and Multisector Growth Models

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