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Excess co-movement in asset prices: The case of South Africa

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Listed:
  • Ocran, Mathew
  • Mlambo, Chipo

Abstract

The paper investigates excess co-movement in asset prices in South Africa between 1995 and 2005 using the definition of excess comovement as correlation between two asset prices beyond what could be explained by key economic fundamentals. The results of the study suggest that there is excess co-movement between returns on equities and bonds in South Africa. The findings suggest that there are considerable noise traders on the financial market in South Africa. The result of this behaviour would be the tendency for the equity and bond prices to move together more than would be predicted by their shared fundamentals. These results are consistent with the possibility that a fad or crowd psychology plays a role in the volatility on the market for the two asset classes.

Suggested Citation

  • Ocran, Mathew & Mlambo, Chipo, 2009. "Excess co-movement in asset prices: The case of South Africa," MPRA Paper 24277, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:24277
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/24277/1/MPRA_paper_24277.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Excess co-movement; Asset prices; equity market; bond market; South Africa;

    JEL classification:

    • D53 - Microeconomics - - General Equilibrium and Disequilibrium - - - Financial Markets
    • N27 - Economic History - - Financial Markets and Institutions - - - Africa; Oceania
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy

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