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Matthew Kofi Ocran

Personal Details

First Name:Matthew
Middle Name:Kofi
Last Name:Ocran
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:poc19
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]

Affiliation

Faculty of Economic and Management Sciences
University of the Western Cape

Bellville, South Africa
http://www.uwc.ac.za/Faculties/EMS/
RePEc:edi:feuwcza (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles Chapters Books

Working papers

  1. Ocran Matthew Kofi, 2019. "Estimating the Size and Trends of the Informal Economy in Ghana," Working Papers 355, African Economic Research Consortium, Research Department.
  2. Atsin, Jessica A.L. & Ocran, Matthew K., 2017. "Financial liberalization and the development of stock markets in Sub-Saharan Africa," MPRA Paper 87580, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  3. Atsin, Jessica A.L. & Ocran, Matthew K., 2015. "Calendar effects and market anomalies on the Johannesburg Stock Exchange," MPRA Paper 87448, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  4. Adenutsi, Deodat E. & Aziakpono, Meshach J. & Ocran, Matthew K., 2011. "The changing impact of macroeconomic environment on remittance inflows in sub-Saharan Africa," MPRA Paper 37067, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  5. Adenutsi, Deodat & Aziakpono, Meshach & Ocran, Matthew, 2011. "Macroeconomic environment and remittances in post-independent Sub-Saharan Africa: Magnitudes, trends and stylised facts," MPRA Paper 42426, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  6. Ocran, Mathew & Mlambo, Chipo, 2009. "Excess co-movement in asset prices: The case of South Africa," MPRA Paper 24277, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  7. Mathew Kofi Ocran, 2007. "A Modelling of Ghana's Inflation Experience: 1960–2003," Working Papers 169, African Economic Research Consortium, Research Department.

Articles

  1. Jaison Chireshe & Matthew K. Ocran & Francesco Tajani, 2020. "Financial development and health care expenditure in Sub Saharan Africa Countries," Cogent Economics & Finance, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 8(1), pages 1771878-177, January.
  2. Jaison Chireshe & Matthew K. Ocran, 2020. "Health care expenditure and health outcomes in sub‐Saharan African countries," African Development Review, African Development Bank, vol. 32(3), pages 349-361, September.
  3. Jaison Chireshe & Matthew. K. Ocran, 2020. "Financial Development and Health Outcomes in Sub-Saharan African Countries," Journal of Developing Areas, Tennessee State University, College of Business, vol. 54(3), pages 145-159, July-Sept.
  4. Deodat E. Adenutsi & Meshach J. Aziakpono & Matthew K. Ocran, 2011. "The Changing Impact Of Macroeconomic Environment On Remittance Inflows In Sub-Saharan Africa," Journal of Academic Research in Economics, Spiru Haret University, Faculty of Accounting and Financial Management Constanta, vol. 3(2 (July)), pages 136-167.
  5. Matthew Kofi Ocran, 2011. "Fiscal policy and economic growth in South Africa," Journal of Economic Studies, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 38(5), pages 604-618, September.
  6. Matthew Kofi Ocran, 2010. "Exchange Rate Pass-Through To Domestic Prices: The Case of South Africa," Prague Economic Papers, Prague University of Economics and Business, vol. 2010(4), pages 291-306.
  7. Matthew Kofi Ocran & Nicholas Biekpe, 2008. "Agricultural commodity supply response in Ghana," Journal of Economic Studies, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 35(3), pages 224-235, August.
  8. Matthew Kofi Ocran & Nicholas Biekpe, 2007. "The Role Of Commodity Prices In Macroeconomic Policy In South Africa," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 75(2), pages 213-220, June.

Chapters

  1. Matthew Kofi Ocran, 2019. "Mercantilism as a World Economic Order," Palgrave Studies in Economic History, in: Economic Development in the Twenty-first Century, chapter 0, pages 159-196, Palgrave Macmillan.
  2. Matthew Kofi Ocran, 2019. "Medieval African Economies: AD 700–1500," Palgrave Studies in Economic History, in: Economic Development in the Twenty-first Century, chapter 0, pages 199-220, Palgrave Macmillan.
  3. Matthew Kofi Ocran, 2019. "Lessons and Ideas for Charting a New Development Path in Africa," Palgrave Studies in Economic History, in: Economic Development in the Twenty-first Century, chapter 0, pages 373-392, Palgrave Macmillan.
  4. Matthew Kofi Ocran, 2019. "Why History Is Important in Africa’s Economic Development Narrative," Palgrave Studies in Economic History, in: Economic Development in the Twenty-first Century, chapter 0, pages 3-18, Palgrave Macmillan.
  5. Matthew Kofi Ocran, 2019. "Economic Development: Facts, Theories and Evidence," Palgrave Studies in Economic History, in: Economic Development in the Twenty-first Century, chapter 0, pages 19-70, Palgrave Macmillan.
  6. Matthew Kofi Ocran, 2019. "Emaciation of African Economies I: The Slave Trades, 1451–1830," Palgrave Studies in Economic History, in: Economic Development in the Twenty-first Century, chapter 0, pages 221-247, Palgrave Macmillan.
  7. Matthew Kofi Ocran, 2019. "Development Approaches from East Asia," Palgrave Studies in Economic History, in: Economic Development in the Twenty-first Century, chapter 0, pages 71-130, Palgrave Macmillan.
  8. Matthew Kofi Ocran, 2019. "Emaciation of African Economies II: Colonisation 1880–1960," Palgrave Studies in Economic History, in: Economic Development in the Twenty-first Century, chapter 0, pages 249-300, Palgrave Macmillan.
  9. Matthew Kofi Ocran, 2019. "Medieval European Economies, AD 400–1500," Palgrave Studies in Economic History, in: Economic Development in the Twenty-first Century, chapter 0, pages 133-158, Palgrave Macmillan.
  10. Matthew Kofi Ocran, 2019. "Post-Independence African Economies: 1960–2015," Palgrave Studies in Economic History, in: Economic Development in the Twenty-first Century, chapter 0, pages 301-372, Palgrave Macmillan.

Books

  1. Matthew Kofi Ocran, 2019. "Economic Development in the Twenty-first Century," Palgrave Studies in Economic History, Palgrave Macmillan, number 978-3-030-10770-3, December.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Atsin, Jessica A.L. & Ocran, Matthew K., 2015. "Calendar effects and market anomalies on the Johannesburg Stock Exchange," MPRA Paper 87448, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    Cited by:

    1. Obalade Adefemi A. & Muzindutsi Paul-Francois, 2019. "The Adaptive Market Hypothesis and the Day-of-the-Week Effect in African Stock Markets: the Markov Switching Model," Comparative Economic Research, Sciendo, vol. 22(3), pages 145-162, September.

  2. Adenutsi, Deodat E. & Aziakpono, Meshach J. & Ocran, Matthew K., 2011. "The changing impact of macroeconomic environment on remittance inflows in sub-Saharan Africa," MPRA Paper 37067, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    Cited by:

    1. Deodat E. Adenutsi, 2014. "macroeconomic determinants of workers’ remittances and compensation of employees in sub-saharan Africa," Journal of Developing Areas, Tennessee State University, College of Business, vol. 48(1), pages 337-360, January-M.
    2. Adenutsi, Deodat & Aziakpono, Meshach & Ocran, Matthew, 2011. "Macroeconomic environment and remittances in post-independent Sub-Saharan Africa: Magnitudes, trends and stylised facts," MPRA Paper 42426, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Hrushikesh Mallick, 2017. "Determinants of workers’ remittances: An empirical investigation for a panel of eleven developing Asian economies," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 40(12), pages 2875-2900, December.

  3. Adenutsi, Deodat & Aziakpono, Meshach & Ocran, Matthew, 2011. "Macroeconomic environment and remittances in post-independent Sub-Saharan Africa: Magnitudes, trends and stylised facts," MPRA Paper 42426, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    Cited by:

    1. Deodat E. Adenutsi, 2014. "macroeconomic determinants of workers’ remittances and compensation of employees in sub-saharan Africa," Journal of Developing Areas, Tennessee State University, College of Business, vol. 48(1), pages 337-360, January-M.

  4. Mathew Kofi Ocran, 2007. "A Modelling of Ghana's Inflation Experience: 1960–2003," Working Papers 169, African Economic Research Consortium, Research Department.

    Cited by:

    1. Deraniyagala, Sonali & Kaluwa, Ben, 2011. "Macroeconomic policy for employment creation: The case of Malawi," MPRA Paper 52715, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Makochekanwa, Albert, 2010. "Estimating the size and trends of the second economy in Zimbabwe," MPRA Paper 37807, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Patrick Enu & Emmanuel Dodzi K. Havi, 2014. "Macroeconomic Determinants of Inflation In Ghana: A Co integration Approach," International Journal of Academic Research in Business and Social Sciences, Human Resource Management Academic Research Society, International Journal of Academic Research in Business and Social Sciences, vol. 4(7), pages 95-110, July.
    4. Philip Kofi Adom & William Bekoe & George Quartey & Kwaku Amakye & Charles Barnor, 2016. "Impact of Market-based Policies and External Fiscal Discipline on Ghana's Inflation," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 20(4), pages 794-816, November.
    5. Joseph Magnus Frimpong & Eric Fosu Oteng-Abayie, 2010. "When is Inflation Harmful? Estimating the Threshold Effect for Ghana," American Journal of Economics and Business Administration, Science Publications, vol. 2(3), pages 232-239, September.
    6. Cuma BOZKURT, 2014. "Money, Inflation and Growth Relationship: The Turkish Case," International Journal of Economics and Financial Issues, Econjournals, vol. 4(2), pages 309-322.
    7. Amankwah, Ernest & Atta Sarfo, Prince, 2019. "The causal linkages among money growth, inflaion and interest rates in Ghana," MPRA Paper 96485, University Library of Munich, Germany.

Articles

  1. Jaison Chireshe & Matthew K. Ocran & Francesco Tajani, 2020. "Financial development and health care expenditure in Sub Saharan Africa Countries," Cogent Economics & Finance, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 8(1), pages 1771878-177, January.

    Cited by:

    1. Ofeh M. Edoh & Tii N. Nchofoung & Ofeh E. Anchi, 2021. "The Impact of Financial Inclusion on Household Health Expenditures in Africa," Working Papers 21/080, European Xtramile Centre of African Studies (EXCAS).

  2. Jaison Chireshe & Matthew K. Ocran, 2020. "Health care expenditure and health outcomes in sub‐Saharan African countries," African Development Review, African Development Bank, vol. 32(3), pages 349-361, September.

    Cited by:

    1. Sosson Tadadjeu & Henri Njangang & Simplice A. Asongu & Brice Kamguia, 2021. "Natural resources, child mortality and governance quality in African countries," Working Papers 21/027, European Xtramile Centre of African Studies (EXCAS).
    2. Yannick Fosso Djoumessi, 2021. "The adverse impact of the Covid‐19 pandemic on the labor market in Cameroon," African Development Review, African Development Bank, vol. 33(S1), pages 31-44, April.
    3. Ofeh M. Edoh & Tii N. Nchofoung & Ofeh E. Anchi, 2021. "The Impact of Financial Inclusion on Household Health Expenditures in Africa," Working Papers 21/080, European Xtramile Centre of African Studies (EXCAS).
    4. Albert Opoku Frimpong & Eugenia Amporfu & Eric Arthur, 2021. "Effect of the Ghana National Health Insurance Scheme on exit time from catastrophic healthcare expenditure," African Development Review, African Development Bank, vol. 33(3), pages 492-505, September.
    5. M. Boubacar Bathily & Omar Sene, 2021. "Décomposition des sources d'inégalité d'accès à la santé de l'enfant: Une analyse comparative de quelques pays d'Afrique Subsaharienne," African Development Review, African Development Bank, vol. 33(2), pages 221-233, June.

  3. Deodat E. Adenutsi & Meshach J. Aziakpono & Matthew K. Ocran, 2011. "The Changing Impact Of Macroeconomic Environment On Remittance Inflows In Sub-Saharan Africa," Journal of Academic Research in Economics, Spiru Haret University, Faculty of Accounting and Financial Management Constanta, vol. 3(2 (July)), pages 136-167.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  4. Matthew Kofi Ocran, 2011. "Fiscal policy and economic growth in South Africa," Journal of Economic Studies, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 38(5), pages 604-618, September.

    Cited by:

    1. Francois J. Stofberg & Jan H. van Heerden & Heinrich R. Bohlmann, 2020. "A Fiscus for Better Economic and Social Development in South Africa," Working Papers 202072, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics.
    2. Canavire-Bacarreza, Gustavo & Martínez-Vázquez, Jorge & Vulovic, Violeta, 2018. "Taxation and Economic Growth in Latin America," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 4583, Inter-American Development Bank.
    3. Ibrahim Ayoade Adekunle & Sheriffdeen Adewale Tella & Oluwaseyi Adedayo Adelowokan, 2021. "Macroeconomic policy volatility and household consumption in Africa," SN Business & Economics, Springer, vol. 1(3), pages 1-22, March.
    4. Nouran Hussein & Jasmin Fouad, 2020. "When the Art of Macroeconomic Management Confronts the Evolution of Business Cycles: Zooming into the Egyptian Case," International Journal of Business and Management, International Institute of Social and Economic Sciences, vol. 8(1), pages 11-34, May.
    5. Ubi-Abai, Itoro & Ekere, Daniel, 2018. "Fiscal Policy, Monetary Policy and Economic Growth in Sub-Saharan Africa," MPRA Paper 91950, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Olufemi Samuel Adegboyo & Sunday Anderu Keji & Oluwadamilola Tosin Fasina, 2021. "The impact of government policies on Nigeria economic growth (case of fiscal, monetary and trade policies)," Future Business Journal, Springer, vol. 7(1), pages 1-14, December.
    7. Alicja Sekula & Joanna Smiechowicz, 2015. "Systems of general grants for local governments in selected EU countries against the background of the general theory of fiscal policy," Working Papers 95/2015, Institute of Economic Research, revised Apr 2015.
    8. Muhammad Irfan Javaid Attari & Roshaiza Taha & Muhammad Imran Farooq, 2014. "Tax Revenue, Stock Market and Economic Growth of Pakistan," Acta Universitatis Danubius. OEconomica, Danubius University of Galati, issue 5(5), pages 136-148, October.
    9. Omoshoro-Jones, Oyeyinka Sunday, 2016. "A Cointegration and Causality Test on Government Expenditure –Economic Growth Nexus: Empirical Evidence from a South African Province," MPRA Paper 102085, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 17 Oct 2017.
    10. Suleman Sarwar & Dalia Streimikiene & Rida Waheed & Ashwag Dignah & Asta Mikalauskiene, 2021. "Does the Vision 2030 and Value Added Tax Leads to Sustainable Economic Growth: The Case of Saudi Arabia?," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 13(19), pages 1-20, October.
    11. Jamel JOUINI, 2018. "Measuring the Macroeconomic Impacts of Fiscal Policy Shocks in the Saudi Economy : A Markov Switching Approach," Journal for Economic Forecasting, Institute for Economic Forecasting, vol. 0(4), pages 55-70, December.
    12. Olorunfemi Yasiru ALIMI & Olumuyiwa Ganiyu YINUSA & Ishola Rufus AKINTOYE & Olalekan Bashir AWORINDE, 2015. "Macroeconomic Effects of Fiscal Policy Changes in Nigeria," The Journal of Accounting and Management, Danubius University of Galati, issue 3, pages 85-94, December.
    13. Mthokozisi Mlilo & Umakrishnan Kollamparambi, 2016. "Fiscal policy, employment, and output in South Africa: An open economy analysis," Journal of Economic and Financial Studies (JEFS), LAR Center Press, vol. 4(3), pages 11-23, June.
    14. Abdullah Ali Al-Masaeed & Evgeny Tsaregorodtsev, 2018. "The Impact of Fiscal Policy on the Economic Growth of Jordan," International Journal of Economics and Finance, Canadian Center of Science and Education, vol. 10(10), pages 145-145, October.
    15. Tshembhani Mackson HLONGWANE & Itumeleng Pleasure MONGALE & Lavisa TALA, 2018. "Analysis of the Impact of Fiscal Policy on Economic Growth in South Africa: VECM Approach," Journal of Economics and Behavioral Studies, AMH International, vol. 10(2), pages 231-238.

  5. Matthew Kofi Ocran, 2010. "Exchange Rate Pass-Through To Domestic Prices: The Case of South Africa," Prague Economic Papers, Prague University of Economics and Business, vol. 2010(4), pages 291-306.

    Cited by:

    1. Jarmila Zimmermannová & Michal Menšík, 2013. "Ex post analýza zavedení zdanění pevných paliv, zemního plynu a elektřiny [Ex-Post Analysis of Solid Fuels, Natural Gas and Electricity Taxation Introduction]," Politická ekonomie, Prague University of Economics and Business, vol. 2013(1), pages 46-66.
    2. Rucha R. Ranadive & L.G. Burange, 2015. "Transmission Mechanism of Exchange Rate Pass-through in India," Foreign Trade Review, , vol. 50(4), pages 263-283, November.
    3. Abimelech Paye Gbatu & Zhen Wang & Presley K. Wesseh Jr. & Isaac Yak Repha Tutdel, 2017. "Causal Effects and Dynamic Relationship between Exchange Rate Volatility and Economic Development in Liberia," International Journal of Economics and Financial Issues, Econjournals, vol. 7(4), pages 119-131.
    4. Erick Lusekelo Mwambuli & Zhang Xianzhi & Zakayo S. Kisava, 2016. "Volatility Spillover Effects Between Stock Prices and Exchange Rates in Emerging Economies: Evidence from Turkey," Business and Economic Research, Macrothink Institute, vol. 6(2), pages 343-359, December.
    5. Ojonugwa Usman & Muhammad Sani Musa, 2018. "Revisiting Exchange Rate Pass-Through to Consumer Price Inflation in Nigeria: A Cointegrated Vector Autoregressive Approach," Academic Journal of Economic Studies, Faculty of Finance, Banking and Accountancy Bucharest,"Dimitrie Cantemir" Christian University Bucharest, vol. 4(1), pages 60-67, March.
    6. Farhan AHMED & Muhammad OWAIS & Sandhya KUMARI & Rohit RAJJANI, 2018. "Exchange rate pass-through to macroeconomic indicators using Vector Auto Regression: Empirical evidence from Pakistan," Theoretical and Applied Economics, Asociatia Generala a Economistilor din Romania - AGER, vol. 0(3(616), A), pages 61-76, Autumn.
    7. Mehmet Balcilar & Ojonugwa Usman & Esther Abdul Agbede, 2019. "Revisiting the Exchange Rate Pass‐Through to Inflation in Africa’s Two Largest Economies: Nigeria and South Africa," African Development Review, African Development Bank, vol. 31(2), pages 245-257, June.

  6. Matthew Kofi Ocran & Nicholas Biekpe, 2008. "Agricultural commodity supply response in Ghana," Journal of Economic Studies, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 35(3), pages 224-235, August.

    Cited by:

    1. Katsushi Imai & Raghav Gaiha & Ganesh Thapa, 2008. "Supply response to changes in agricultural commodity prices in Asian countries," Economics Discussion Paper Series 0808, Economics, The University of Manchester.

  7. Matthew Kofi Ocran & Nicholas Biekpe, 2007. "The Role Of Commodity Prices In Macroeconomic Policy In South Africa," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 75(2), pages 213-220, June.

    Cited by:

    1. Hegerty, Scott W., 2016. "Commodity-price volatility and macroeconomic spillovers: Evidence from nine emerging markets," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 23-37.

Chapters

    Sorry, no citations of chapters recorded.

Books

    Sorry, no citations of books recorded.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 2 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-AFR: Africa (1) 2012-03-14
  2. NEP-CFN: Corporate Finance (1) 2018-08-13
  3. NEP-FDG: Financial Development & Growth (1) 2018-08-13
  4. NEP-MAC: Macroeconomics (1) 2012-03-14
  5. NEP-MIG: Economics of Human Migration (1) 2012-03-14

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