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Macroeconomic effects of fiscal policy changes: A case of South Africa

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  • Akanbi, Olusegun Ayodele

Abstract

This study develops comprehensive full-sector macro-econometric models for the South African economy with the aim of explaining and providing the macroeconomic effects of fiscal policy changes in the country. The models are applied to test the effectiveness of fiscal policy actions in an economic environment with existing structural supply constraints versus demand-side constraints and also to detect which components of the fiscal would be more effective in stabilising the economy. Based on the structure of the South African economy and the framework presented, the study concludes that the South African economy can be characterised as one which is embedded with structural supply constraints. Thus, a model which is suitable for policy analyses of the South African economy needs to capture the long-run supply-side characteristics of the economy. A price block is incorporated to specify the price adjustment between the supply-side sector and real aggregate demand sector. The models are estimated with time-series data from 1970 to 2011, capturing both the long-run and short-run dynamic properties of the economy. The results from the series of fiscal policy scenarios suggest that fiscal policy actions are more effective in an economic environment with limited or no supply constraints. Fiscal expansion or consolidation that comes more from government spending changes will be more effective in an economic environment where structural supply constraints are absent while tax revenue changes will be more effective in an economic environment where there exist major structural supply constraints.

Suggested Citation

  • Akanbi, Olusegun Ayodele, 2013. "Macroeconomic effects of fiscal policy changes: A case of South Africa," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 771-785.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecmode:v:35:y:2013:i:c:p:771-785
    DOI: 10.1016/j.econmod.2013.08.039
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Konstantin Makrelov & Channing Arndt & Rob Davies & Laurence Harris, 2018. "Fiscal multipliers in South Africa: The importance of financial sector dynamics," WIDER Working Paper Series 006, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    2. Olorunfemi Yasiru ALIMI & Olumuyiwa Ganiyu YINUSA & Ishola Rufus AKINTOYE & Olalekan Bashir AWORINDE, 2015. "Macroeconomic Effects of Fiscal Policy Changes in Nigeria," The Journal of Accounting and Management, Danubius University of Galati, issue 3, pages 85-94, December.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Macro-econometric modelling; Macroeconomics; Fiscal policy; South Africa;

    JEL classification:

    • C51 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Model Construction and Estimation
    • C53 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Forecasting and Prediction Models; Simulation Methods
    • C32 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes; State Space Models
    • E20 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - General (includes Measurement and Data)
    • E62 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Fiscal Policy
    • H60 - Public Economics - - National Budget, Deficit, and Debt - - - General

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