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Regional Growth in China: An Empirical Investigation using Multiple Imputation and Province-level Panel Data

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  • Chen, Baizhu
  • Phillips, Kerk L.

Abstract

This paper examines the contributions of various factors to China’s economic growth. The methodology is discussed in papers by Levine and Renelt (1992) and Sala-i-Martin (1997). Using multiple imputation techniques on a panel data from 1978 to 1999 for 30 provinces, autonomous regions, and independently administered cities, we find that provinces with more innovation capital and more bank-deposit-to-GDP ratios tend to experience higher economic growth. Migration of people into a province, the number of higher education teachers, railroad density & local government revenue as a percent of total government spending are all negatively related to subsequent growth rates.

Suggested Citation

  • Chen, Baizhu & Phillips, Kerk L., 2008. "Regional Growth in China: An Empirical Investigation using Multiple Imputation and Province-level Panel Data," MPRA Paper 23553, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:23553
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Fleisher, Belton M. & Chen, Jian, 1997. "The Coast-Noncoast Income Gap, Productivity, and Regional Economic Policy in China," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 25(2), pages 220-236, October.
    2. Phillips, Kerk L. & Kunrong, Shen, 2005. "What effect does the size of the state-owned sector have on regional growth in China?," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(6), pages 1079-1102, January.
    3. Serge Coulombe, 2000. "New Evidence of Convergence Across Canadian Provinces: The Role of Urbanization," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(8), pages 713-725.
    4. Nicholas Apergis, 2005. "Inflation Uncertainty And Growth: Evidence From Panel Data ," Australian Economic Papers, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 44(2), pages 186-197, June.
    5. Barro, Robert J. & Lee, Jong-Wha, 1993. "International comparisons of educational attainment," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(3), pages 363-394, December.
    6. Robert J. Barro, 1991. "Economic Growth in a Cross Section of Countries," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 106(2), pages 407-443.
    7. Sala-i-Martin, Xavier, 1997. "I Just Ran Two Million Regressions," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 87(2), pages 178-183, May.
    8. Paul Cashin & Ratna Sahay, 1996. "Internal Migration, Center-State Grants, and Economic Growth in the States of India," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 43(1), pages 123-171, March.
    9. Levine, Ross & Renelt, David, 1992. "A Sensitivity Analysis of Cross-Country Growth Regressions," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(4), pages 942-963, September.
    10. Ji Kim, 2005. "Convergence hypothesis of regional income in Korea," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(7), pages 431-435.
    11. Ana Lamo, 2000. "On convergence empirics: same evidence for Spanish regions," Investigaciones Economicas, Fundación SEPI, vol. 24(3), pages 681-707, September.
    12. Gregory C. Chow, 1993. "Capital Formation and Economic Growth in China," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 108(3), pages 809-842.
    13. Liu, Tung & Li, Kui-Wai, 2001. "Impact of liberalization of financial resources in China's economic growth: evidence from provinces," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 12(2), pages 245-262.
    14. Leamer, Edward E, 1985. "Sensitivity Analyses Would Help," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 75(3), pages 308-313, June.
    15. Johnson, Paul A., 2000. "A nonparametric analysis of income convergence across the US states," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 69(2), pages 219-223, November.
    16. Paap, Richard & Franses, Philip Hans & van Dijk, Dick, 2005. "Does Africa grow slower than Asia, Latin America and the Middle East? Evidence from a new data-based classification method," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 77(2), pages 553-570, August.
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    Cited by:

    1. Benos, Nikos & Zotou, Stefania, 2014. "Education and Economic Growth: A Meta-Regression Analysis," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 669-689.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    growth; provinces; empirical; panel-data;

    JEL classification:

    • H10 - Public Economics - - Structure and Scope of Government - - - General
    • O47 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Empirical Studies of Economic Growth; Aggregate Productivity; Cross-Country Output Convergence
    • O53 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Asia including Middle East

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