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Inequality in workers’ lifelong learning across european countries: Evidence from EU-SILC data-set

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  • Biagetti, Marco
  • Scicchitano, Sergio

Abstract

The primary purpose of this paper is to explore the potential for EU-SILC data to deepen our understanding of the determinants of inequality in workers’ formal life-long learning (LLL) in Europe. In particular we investigate the incidence of personal, job-specific and firm-specific characteristics on the workers’ probability to undertake adult learning. To do so, we first estimate LLL incidence in the whole sample for men and women. Then we estimate separate 21 country-specific equations, for both sexes. This method allows to investigate cross-country gender differences and avoid unobserved heteroscedasticity due to sex, which we clearly find in the data. For the whole sample the results show that, for both men and women, formal LLL incidence is significantly higher among young, better educated, part-time and temporary workers, and lower among those who changed current job in the last year, employed in small firms and having low-skilled occupations. Furthermore, some gender differences for the whole sample emerge. When estimating separate equations for each country and for both sexes, a significant cross-country heterogeneity and a weaker significance of the coefficients come to light. In particular, a couple of relevant results emerge for Scandinavian countries with regard to the complementarity between past level of education and current adult learning. Finland is the only country in the sample in which, for both men and women, less educated workers are more likely to undertake formal LLL, thus making adult learning system able to avoid, for both men and women, existing inequality in human capital, as it results from education levels. Denmark is the only country where, for women, being less educated turns out to be the predictor with the greatest significant magnitude of the effect in the variation of the probability.

Suggested Citation

  • Biagetti, Marco & Scicchitano, Sergio, 2009. "Inequality in workers’ lifelong learning across european countries: Evidence from EU-SILC data-set," MPRA Paper 17356, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:17356
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/17356/1/MPRA_paper_17356.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Brunello, Giorgio & Medio, Alfredo, 2001. "An explanation of international differences in education and workplace training," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 45(2), pages 307-322, February.
    2. Carneiro, Pedro & Heckman, James J., 2003. "Human Capital Policy," IZA Discussion Papers 821, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Asplund, Rita, 2004. "The Provision and Effects of Company Training. A brief review of the literature," Discussion Papers 907, The Research Institute of the Finnish Economy.
    4. Yatchew, Adonis & Griliches, Zvi, 1985. "Specification Error in Probit Models," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 67(1), pages 134-139, February.
    5. Paul D. Allison, 1999. "Comparing Logit and Probit Coefficients Across Groups," Sociological Methods & Research, , vol. 28(2), pages 186-208, November.
    6. Andrea Bassanini, 2004. "Improving skills for more and better jobs?," Post-Print halshs-00169612, HAL.
    7. J. Scott Long & Jeremy Freese, 2006. "Regression Models for Categorical Dependent Variables using Stata, 2nd Edition," Stata Press books, StataCorp LP, edition 2, number long2, April.
    8. Marianne Simonsen & Lars Skipper, 2008. "The Incidence and Intensity of Formal Lifelong Learning," Economics Working Papers 2008-07, Department of Economics and Business Economics, Aarhus University.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Agnieszka Chlon-Dominczak & Maciej Lis, 2013. "Does gender matter for lifelong learning activity?," IBS Working Papers 3/2013, Instytut Badan Strukturalnych.
    2. Wei-Bin ZHANG, 2014. "Gender Discrimination, Education and Economic Growth in a Generalized Uzawa-Lucas Two-Sector Model," Timisoara Journal of Economics and Business, West University of Timisoara, Romania, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, vol. 7(1), pages 1-34.
    3. repec:etc:journl:y:2018:i:17:p:122-145 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Wei-Bin Zhang, 2016. "Gender-Differentiated Human Capital And Time Distributions In A Generalized Heckscher-Ohlin Model With Endogenous Physical Capital," Knowledge Horizons - Economics, Faculty of Finance, Banking and Accountancy Bucharest,"Dimitrie Cantemir" Christian University Bucharest, vol. 8(2), pages 112-132, June.
    5. Zhang Wei-Bin, 2012. "Education and Human Capital Accumulation in a Two -Sector Growth Model with Elastic Labor Supply," Scientific Annals of Economics and Business, De Gruyter Open, vol. 59(1), pages 289-309, July.
    6. Jorge Calero & Josep-Oriol Escardíbul, 2014. "Barriers to non-formal professional training in Spain in periods of economic growth and crisis. An analysis with special attention to the effect of the previous human capital of workers," Working Papers 2014/12, Institut d'Economia de Barcelona (IEB).
    7. Agnieszka Chlon-Dominczak & Agnieszka Kaminska & Iga Magda, 2013. "Women as a Potential of the European Labour Force," IBS Policy Papers 1/2013, Instytut Badan Strukturalnych.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    education; training; lifelong learning; human capital; inequality; Europe;

    JEL classification:

    • J40 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - General
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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