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Science, Technology and Innovation for Economic Growth: Linking Policy Research and Practice in "STIG Systems"

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  • David, Paul
  • Aghion, Philippe

Abstract

This paper reflects on the relevance of "systems-theoretic" approaches to theinterdependent policy issues relating to the dynamics of science, technology and innovation and their relationship to economic growth. Considering the approach that characterizes much of the current economics literature's treatment of technology and growth policies, we pose the critical question: what kind of systems paradigm is likely to prove particularly fruitful in that particular problem-domain? Evolutionary, neo-Schumpeterian, and complex system dynamics approaches are conceptually attractive, and we examine their respective virtues and limitations. Both qualities are redily visible when one tries to connect systems-relevant research with practical policy-making in this field.

Suggested Citation

  • David, Paul & Aghion, Philippe, 2008. "Science, Technology and Innovation for Economic Growth: Linking Policy Research and Practice in "STIG Systems"," MPRA Paper 12096, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:12096
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    science and technology policy; innovation policy; R&D subsidies; IPR; systems research; economic growth theory; complementarities; positive feedbacks; complexity; market failurees; policy implementation failures;

    JEL classification:

    • O1 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development
    • D50 - Microeconomics - - General Equilibrium and Disequilibrium - - - General

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