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Natural disaster death and socio-economic factors in selected Asian countries: A panel data analysis


  • Padli, Jaharudin
  • Habibullah, M.S.


The purpose of the present study is to investigate the relationship between disaster fatalities with the level of economic development, years of schooling, land area and population for a panel of fifteen Asian countries over the sample period over 1970 to 2005. Our results indicates that the relationship between disaster losses and the level of economic development is nonlinear in nature suggesting that at lower income level, a country is more disaster resilience but at higher income level, an economy become less disaster resistant. Other disaster determinants of interest is the level of education which suggests that educational attainment reduces human fatalities as a result of disaster; larger population will increase death toll and larger land area will reduce disaster fatalities. 1. INTRODUCTION

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  • Padli, Jaharudin & Habibullah, M.S., 2008. "Natural disaster death and socio-economic factors in selected Asian countries: A panel data analysis," MPRA Paper 11921, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:11921

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Noy, Ilan, 2009. "The macroeconomic consequences of disasters," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(2), pages 221-231, March.
    2. Toya, Hideki & Skidmore, Mark, 2007. "Economic development and the impacts of natural disasters," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 94(1), pages 20-25, January.
    3. Tobias N. Rasmussen, 2004. "Macroeconomic Implications of Natural Disasters in the Caribbean," IMF Working Papers 04/224, International Monetary Fund.
    4. Matthew E. Kahn, 2005. "The Death Toll from Natural Disasters: The Role of Income, Geography, and Institutions," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 87(2), pages 271-284, May.
    5. Barro, Robert J & Lee, Jong Wha, 1996. "International Measures of Schooling Years and Schooling Quality," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 86(2), pages 218-223, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. van Bergeijk, P.A.G. & Lazzaroni, S., 2013. "Macroeconomics of natural disasters," ISS Working Papers - General Series 50075, International Institute of Social Studies of Erasmus University Rotterdam (ISS), The Hague.
    2. Lazzaroni, Sara & van Bergeijk, Peter A.G., 2014. "Natural disasters' impact, factors of resilience and development: A meta-analysis of the macroeconomic literature," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 107(C), pages 333-346.
    3. Li, C. & van Bergeijk, P.A.G., 2016. "Do natural disasters stimulate international trade?," ISS Working Papers - General Series 622, International Institute of Social Studies of Erasmus University Rotterdam (ISS), The Hague.
    4. Zereyesus, Yacob & Tsiboe, Francis & Embaye, Weldensie, 2016. "The Effect of Shocks and Remittances on Household’s Vulnerability to Food Poverty: Evidence from Bangladesh," 2016 Annual Meeting, July 31-August 2, 2016, Boston, Massachusetts 236199, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    5. Yang Zhou & Ning Li & Wenxiang Wu & Haolong Liu & Li Wang & Guangxu Liu & Jidong Wu, 2014. "Socioeconomic development and the impact of natural disasters: some empirical evidences from China," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 74(2), pages 541-554, November.
    6. Christian R. Jaramillo H., 2009. "Do Natural Disasters Have Long-term Effects on Growth?," DOCUMENTOS CEDE 006647, UNIVERSIDAD DE LOS ANDES-CEDE.

    More about this item


    natural disaster; Asian; Panel data analysis;

    JEL classification:

    • Q00 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - General - - - General
    • E00 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General - - - General

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