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Analyzing new profit opportunities: a guide to making business projects financially successful

  • Winther, K. Tobias
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    This book presents a simple, yet very powerful, conceptual framework, which can be used to estimate market sizes, prices and their interdependency for new products based on historical market data for existing products in related areas. Even in situations where insufficient data is available the methods can be used in a semi-quantitative manner to evaluate the market potential for a given product or find ways to improve upon the product to make it more successful in the marketplace. The methods are explained in detail, examples of practical applications are provided; and the foundation in existing economic theory is discussed.

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    Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 11346.

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    Date of creation: 18 Aug 2008
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:11346
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    1. K. R. MacCrimmon & M. Toda, 1969. "The Experimental Determination of Indifference Curves," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 36(4), pages 433-451.
    2. Nicholas Barberis & Richard Thaler, 2002. "A Survey of Behavioral Finance," NBER Working Papers 9222, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Russell Cooper & Joao Ejarque, 2000. "Exhuming Q: Market Power vs. Capital Market Imperfections," Econometric Society World Congress 2000 Contributed Papers 0528, Econometric Society.
    4. Barla, Philippe, 1997. "Firm Size Inequality and Market Power," Cahiers de recherche 9714, Université Laval - Département d'économique.
    5. Jonathan L. Willis, 2003. "Implications of structural changes in the U.S. economy for pricing behavior and inflation dynamics," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, issue Q I, pages 5-27.
    6. Domenico Marchetti, 2002. "Markups and the Business Cycle: Evidence from Italian Manufacturing Branches," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 13(1), pages 87-103, January.
    7. J. Doyne Farmer & Martin Shubik & Eric Smith, 2005. "Economics: the next physical science?," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 1520, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University.
    8. Matthew D. Shapiro, 1987. "Measuring Market Power in U.S. Industry," NBER Working Papers 2212, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Alexis Jacquemin, 1987. "The New Industrial Organization: Market Forces and Strategic Behavior," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262600145, June.
    10. Campbell, Cynthia J & Kazemi, Hossein B & Nanisetty, Prasad, 1999. "Time-Varying Risk and Return in the Bond Market: A Test of a New Equilibrium Pricing Model," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 12(3), pages 631-42.
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