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Conflict, Livelihoods, and Poverty in Guinea-Bissau: An Overview

Author

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  • Barry, Boubacar-Sid
  • Gacitua-Mario, Estanislao
  • Wodon, Quentin

Abstract

Conflict and political instability have considerably weakened Guinea-Bissau’s productive infrastructure during the past three decades. This situation has contributed to an increase in the degree of vulnerability of the population, especially in rural areas. As growth has been weak, poverty levels have remained high. This paper serves as an introduction and overview for a book that provides a collection of papers on conflict, livelihoods, and poverty in Guinea-Bissau based on both a nationally representative 2002 household survey and a small-scale survey with both quantitative and qualitative components implemented in 2004. After a brief review of political developments since independence, this overview summarizes the report’s main findings in the areas of conflict, growth and poverty, institutions and social networks, the characteristics of the poor and determinants of poverty, the population’s means of livelihood, and, finally, cashew production and taxation.

Suggested Citation

  • Barry, Boubacar-Sid & Gacitua-Mario, Estanislao & Wodon, Quentin, 2007. "Conflict, Livelihoods, and Poverty in Guinea-Bissau: An Overview," MPRA Paper 11115, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:11115
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/11115/1/MPRA_paper_11115.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Kohnert, Dirk, 2009. "Democratisation via elections in an African 'narco state'? The case of Guinea-Bissau," MPRA Paper 19109, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Conflict; Livelihoods; Poverty; Gionea-Bissau;

    JEL classification:

    • D74 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Conflict; Conflict Resolution; Alliances; Revolutions
    • N17 - Economic History - - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics; Industrial Structure; Growth; Fluctuations - - - Africa; Oceania
    • I32 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Measurement and Analysis of Poverty

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