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Pandemics, food security and the gains from trade

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  • Mountford, Andrew

Abstract

Why has the recent covid-19 pandemic led to the imposition of export quotas in many countries? Why is the agricultural sector highly protected in developed economies? We show how the addition of subsistence constraints to the standard models of international trade together with a potential shock to trade offers a simple explanation of these facts. This simple adaption of the standard trade model also provides a new mechanism for the existence of a ’Transfer Paradox’. A transfer of resources prior to production acts as a kind of ex ante insurance against trade disruption which mitigates the effects of the missing market for trade disruption insurance. The effect of a transfer can be large enough that both the donor and recipient benefit. Although the analysis focuses on agricultural goods it applies to any good or technology regarded as essential for production.

Suggested Citation

  • Mountford, Andrew, 2020. "Pandemics, food security and the gains from trade," MPRA Paper 100774, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:100774
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/100774/1/MPRA_paper_100774.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    International Trade ; Income Distribution; Growth and Development;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • F11 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Neoclassical Models of Trade
    • F43 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Economic Growth of Open Economies
    • O43 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Institutions and Growth

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