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Is Labor Export Good Development Policy?

Author

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  • Ernesto M. Pernia

    (School of Economics, University of the Philippines Diliman)

Abstract

Labor migration began to be promoted in the late 60s or early 70s by a number of Asian countries burdened by problems of unemployment, poverty, and scant foreign exchange. However, labor export was generally intended to be a stop-gap measure while governments were trying to implement policy reform to whip their economies into shape. Indeed, labor migration as policy has largely faded in many of our Asian neighbors but remains a major development policy plank in our country. What has made the Philippines specially cut out to be a labor exporter? What are the benefits and costs of migration? Is the export of labor sustainable? Are we content with being a labor exporter? Is there a need to rethink the country’s labor export policy?

Suggested Citation

  • Ernesto M. Pernia, 2008. "Is Labor Export Good Development Policy?," UP School of Economics Discussion Papers 200813, University of the Philippines School of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:phs:dpaper:200813
    as

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    File URL: http://www.econ.upd.edu.ph/dp/index.php/dp/article/view/100/92
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Bussolo, Maurizio & Medvedev, Denis, 2008. "Do Remittances Have a Flip Side? A General Equilibrium Analysis of Remittances, Labor Supply Responses and Policy Options for Jamaica," Journal of Economic Integration, Center for Economic Integration, Sejong University, vol. 23, pages 734-764.
    2. Adams, Richard Jr. & Page, John, 2005. "Do international migration and remittances reduce poverty in developing countries?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 33(10), pages 1645-1669, October.
    3. Dean Yang, 2004. "International Migration, Human Capital, and Entrepreneurship: Evidence from Philippine Migrants’ Exchange Rate Shocks," Working Papers 531, Research Seminar in International Economics, University of Michigan.
    4. Lopez, Humberto & Molina, Luis & Bussolo, Maurizio, 2007. "Remittances and the real exchange rate," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4213, The World Bank.
    5. Rodriguez, Edgard R, 1998. "International Migration and Income Distribution in the Philippines," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 46(2), pages 329-350, January.
    6. Sawada, Yasuyuki & Estudillo, Jonna P., 2006. "Trade, Migration, and Poverty Reduction in the Globalizing Economy: The Case of the Philippines," WIDER Working Paper Series 058, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    7. M. Pernia , Ernesto & S. Salas, J. M. Ian, 2006. "Investment Climate, Productivity, and Regional Development in a Developing Country," Asian Development Review, Asian Development Bank, vol. 23(2), pages 70-89.
    8. Ernesto M. Pernia, 2006. "Diaspora, Remittances, and Poverty in RP’s Regions," UP School of Economics Discussion Papers 200602, University of the Philippines School of Economics.
    9. Gustafsson, Bjorn & Makonnen, Negatu, 1993. "Poverty and Remittances in Lesotho," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 2(1), pages 49-73, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. International Monetary Fund, 2013. "Philippines; Selected Issues," IMF Staff Country Reports 13/103, International Monetary Fund.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • F24 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - Remittances
    • J08 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General - - - Labor Economics Policies
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers

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