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Global production sharing and trade patterns in East Asia


  • Prema-chandra Athukorala


This paper analyzes trade patterns in East Asia, with special reference to the implications of the development of global production sharing. It examines the nature and extent of global production sharing and the role of East Asian countries within global production networks. It also highlights the rise of China and it’s positioning within these production networks, explores the implications of engagement in global production sharing for growth patterns, and analyzes the pattern of trade contraction across countries and types of goods during the global financial crisis (2008-2009).

Suggested Citation

  • Prema-chandra Athukorala, 2013. "Global production sharing and trade patterns in East Asia," Departmental Working Papers 2013-10, The Australian National University, Arndt-Corden Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:pas:papers:2013-10

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Holger Görg, 2000. "Fragmentation and trade: US inward processing trade in the EU," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 136(3), pages 403-422, September.
    2. Prema-Chandra Athukorala, 2008. "Singapore And Asean In The New Regional Division Of Labor," The Singapore Economic Review (SER), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 53(03), pages 479-508.
    3. Miguel Almunia & Agustín Bénétrix & Barry Eichengreen & Kevin H. O'Rourke & Gisela Rua, 2010. "From Great Depression to Great Credit Crisis: similarities, differences and lessons," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 25, pages 219-265, April.
    4. Prema-chandra Athukorala, 2009. "The Rise of China and East Asian Export Performance: Is the Crowding-Out Fear Warranted?," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 32(2), pages 234-266, February.
    5. Helleiner, Gerald K, 1973. "Manufactured Exports from Less-Developed Countries and Multinational Firms," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 83(329), pages 21-47, March.
    6. Prema-chandra Athukorala, 2005. "Product Fragmentation and Trade Patterns in East Asia," Asian Economic Papers, MIT Press, vol. 4(3), pages 1-27, Fall.
    7. Peter A. Petri, 1993. "The East Asian Trading Bloc: An Analytical History," NBER Chapters,in: Regionalism and Rivalry: Japan and the United States in Pacific Asia, pages 21-52 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Marcus Noland, 1995. "China and the International Economic System," Working Paper Series WP95-6, Peterson Institute for International Economics.
    9. Juan Carlos Hallak & Peter K. Schott, 2011. "Estimating Cross-Country Differences in Product Quality," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 126(1), pages 417-474.
    10. Helpman, Elhanan, 2011. "Understanding Global Trade," Economics Books, Harvard University Press, number 9780674060784, December.
    11. Athukorala, Prema-chandra & Yamashita, Nobuaki, 2006. "Production fragmentation and trade integration: East Asia in a global context," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 17(3), pages 233-256, December.
    12. Hummels, David & Ishii, Jun & Yi, Kei-Mu, 2001. "The nature and growth of vertical specialization in world trade," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(1), pages 75-96, June.
    13. Kojima, Kiyoshi, 2000. "The "flying geese" model of Asian economic development: origin, theoretical extensions, and regional policy implications," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 11(4), pages 375-401.
    14. Barry Eichengreen & Yeongseop Rhee & Hui Tong, 2007. "China and the Exports of Other Asian Countries," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 143(2), pages 201-226, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Tony Irawan & Paul J.J. Welfens, 2016. "ICT Dynamics and Regional Trade Bias in Asia: Theory and Empirical Aspects," EIIW Discussion paper disbei224, Universitätsbibliothek Wuppertal, University Library.
    2. Sjöholm, Fredrik, 2013. "Foreign Direct Investments in Southeast Asia," Working Papers 2013:37, Lund University, Department of Economics.

    More about this item


    trade patterns; East Asia; China; global production sharing; production networks;

    JEL classification:

    • F14 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Empirical Studies of Trade
    • F15 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Economic Integration
    • O53 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Asia including Middle East

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