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Wage Differential, Trade, Productivity Growth and Education


  • Chang, Hsaio-chuan



There is a large literature on the link between wage differential, international trade and productivity growth. The theoretical and empirical research is mainly based on the Heckscher-Ohlin-Samuelson framework and on the cases of a large country. More comprehensive theoretical models are needed to guide further empirical research. This paper contributes to the debate by providing a dynamic intertemporal general equilibrium (DIGE) model incorporating endogenous skill formation. The result tends to support the argument that trade has a responsibility for wage differential. A cut in government education investment tends to raise wage differential. Productivity growth at best causes wage differential in the short run. From a theoretical perspective it is unclear whether productivity growth raises wage differential in the long run once the accumulation of skills is endogenized.

Suggested Citation

  • Chang, Hsaio-chuan, 1999. "Wage Differential, Trade, Productivity Growth and Education," Departmental Working Papers 2000-01, The Australian National University, Arndt-Corden Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:pas:papers:2000-01

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Chen, Been-Lon & Hsu, Mei, 2001. "Time-Series Wage Differential in Taiwan: The Role of International Trade," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 5(2), pages 336-354, June.
    2. Turrini, Alessandro, 1998. "Endogenous education policy and increasing income inequality between skilled and unskilled workers," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 14(2), pages 303-326, May.
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    6. Bhagwati, Jagdish N. & Srinivasan, T. N., 1977. "Education in a `job ladder' model and the fairness-in-hiring rule," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 7(1), pages 1-22, February.
    7. Jeffrey D. Sachs & Howard J. Shatz, 1994. "Trade and Jobs in Manufacturing," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 25(1), pages 1-84.
    8. Eli Berman & John Bound & Zvi Griliches, 1993. "Changes in the Demand for Skilled Labor within U.S. Manufacturing Industries: Evidence from the Annual Survey of Manufacturing," NBER Working Papers 4255, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Phillip L Swagel & Matthew J. Slaughter, 1997. "The Effect of Globalization on Wages in the Advanced Economies," IMF Working Papers 97/43, International Monetary Fund.
    10. Stephen Nickell & D Nicolitsas, 1994. "Wages," CEP Discussion Papers dp0219, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    11. Wood, Adrian, 1995. "North-South Trade, Employment and Inequality: Changing Fortunes in a Skill-Driven World," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198290155.
    12. Edward E. Leamer, 1992. "Wage Effects of A U.S. - Mexican Free Trade Agreement," NBER Working Papers 3991, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    13. Edward E. Leamer, 1992. "Testing Trade Theory," NBER Working Papers 3957, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    14. Eli Berman & John Bound & Zvi Griliches, 1994. "Changes in the Demand for Skilled Labor within U. S. Manufacturing: Evidence from the Annual Survey of Manufactures," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 109(2), pages 367-397.
    15. Wood Júnior, Thomaz, 1995. "Workers," RAE - Revista de Administração de Empresas, FGV-EAESP Escola de Administração de Empresas de São Paulo (Brazil), vol. 35(2), March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Hsiao-chuan Chang, 2002. "Are Foreign Workers Responsible For The Increasing Unemployment Rate In Taiwan?," Department of Economics - Working Papers Series 853, The University of Melbourne.

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