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Inflation Volatility and Economic Development: Evidence from Nigeria

Author

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  • David Fielding

    () (Department of Economics, University of Otago)

Abstract

We use monthly time-series data on the prices of 96 individual products in the 37 states of Nigeria to analyze the factors that drive inflation volatility. Among the significant determinants of volatility are average inflation rates, transport and communication infrastructure, consumer access to credit markets and urbanization. However, there is substantial heterogeneity across products in the relative importance of these factors.

Suggested Citation

  • David Fielding, 2008. "Inflation Volatility and Economic Development: Evidence from Nigeria," Working Papers 0807, University of Otago, Department of Economics, revised Sep 2008.
  • Handle: RePEc:otg:wpaper:0807
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    File URL: http://www.otago.ac.nz/economics/research/otago077111.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2008
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. repec:khe:scajes:v:3:y:2017:i:2:p:68-75 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Wolassa Lawisso Kumo, 2015. "Working Paper - 216 - Inflation Targeting Monetary Policy, Inflation Volatility and Economic Growth in South Africa," Working Paper Series 2154, African Development Bank.
    3. Oseni Isiaq Olasunkanmi & Sanni Hauwa Yetunde, 2016. "Does Fiscal Deficit Granger Cause Impulsiveness in Inflation Rate in Nigeria?," Acta Universitatis Danubius. OEconomica, Danubius University of Galati, issue 12(4), pages 208-216, October.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Inflation; Volatility; Uncertainty; Nigeria;

    JEL classification:

    • E31 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Price Level; Inflation; Deflation
    • O11 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Macroeconomic Analyses of Economic Development

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