IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/osp/wpaper/16e002.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Does trade liberalization help to reduce gender inequality? A cross-country panel data analysis of wage gap

Author

Listed:
  • Nozomi Kimura

    (Osaka School of International Public Policy, Osaka University)

Abstract

This paper examines the relationship between trade openness and the gender wage gap using the wage data divided into six sectors and three different skill levels (high-, medium- and low-skill) in 19 developed countries from 1995 to 2005. We apply static and dynamic panel data models to investigate whether greater trade openness has affected the gender wage gap. The results from the fixed effects model indicate that trade openness decreases the wage gap between men and women in medium- and low-skill jobs, while the relationship between trade openness and the wage gap is insignificant in high-skill jobs. When the two-step difference generalized method of moments (GMM) is employed, trade openness is found to reduce the wage gap in medium-skill jobs, but its effect on the wage gap is insignificant in high- and low-skill jobs.

Suggested Citation

  • Nozomi Kimura, 2016. "Does trade liberalization help to reduce gender inequality? A cross-country panel data analysis of wage gap," OSIPP Discussion Paper 16E002, Osaka School of International Public Policy, Osaka University.
  • Handle: RePEc:osp:wpaper:16e002
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.osipp.osaka-u.ac.jp/archives/DP/2016/DP2016E002.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Sandra E. Black & Elizabeth Brainerd, 2004. "Importing Equality? The Impact of Globalization on Gender Discrimination," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 57(4), pages 540-559, July.
    2. Yanikkaya, Halit, 2003. "Trade openness and economic growth: a cross-country empirical investigation," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 72(1), pages 57-89, October.
    3. Philippe Aghion & Matias Braun & Johannes Fedderke, 2008. "Competition and productivity growth in South Africa," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 16(4), pages 741-768, October.
    4. Kucera, David & Milberg, William, 2000. "Gender Segregation and Gender Bias in Manufacturing Trade Expansion: Revisiting the "Wood Asymmetry"," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 28(7), pages 1191-1210, July.
    5. Juhn, Chinhui & Ujhelyi, Gergely & Villegas-Sanchez, Carolina, 2014. "Men, women, and machines: How trade impacts gender inequality," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 106(C), pages 179-193.
    6. Seguino, Stephanie, 2000. "The Effects of Structural Change and Economic Liberalisation on Gender Wage Differentials in South Korea and Taiwan," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 24(4), pages 437-459, July.
    7. Sauré, Philip & Zoabi, Hosny, 2014. "International trade, the gender wage gap and female labor force participation," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 111(C), pages 17-33.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Trade and gender; wage gap; trade openness;

    JEL classification:

    • F16 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade and Labor Market Interactions
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:osp:wpaper:16e002. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Akiko Murashita). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/iposujp.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.