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Motivation behind remittance from migrants: Evidence from Albania

  • Daichi Shimamoto

    ()

    (Graduate School of Economics, Osaka University, Japan. Research Fellow, Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, Japan.)

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    In Albania, remittance has been an important factor for the countryfs economic growth since the collapse of the countryfs communist regime in the early 1990s. In this paper, I investigated why migrants send remittance to their parents household. In the analysis, I considered four remittance motivations: altruistic, exchange, insurance, and inheritance motivations. To control sample selection of migration, I apply the Heckman sample selection model. The results suggest that migrants in Albania are driven to remit owing to a combination of altruistic, exchange, and inheritance motivations. Further, migration destination influences remittance amount, which implies that not only the local labor market and exchange rate at the final destination but also migration motivation factors affect remittance amount.

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    File URL: http://www2.econ.osaka-u.ac.jp/library/global/dp/1405.pdf
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    Paper provided by Osaka University, Graduate School of Economics and Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP) in its series Discussion Papers in Economics and Business with number 14-05.

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    Length: 38 pages
    Date of creation: Feb 2014
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:osk:wpaper:1405
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.econ.osaka-u.ac.jp/
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    1. Kristin Göbel, 2013. "Remittances, expenditure patterns, and gender: parametric and semiparametric evidence from Ecuador," IZA Journal of Migration, Springer, vol. 2(1), pages 1-19, December.
    2. Donald Cox & Zekeriya Eser & Emmanuel Jimenez, 1996. "Motives for Private Transfers over the Life Cycle: An Analytical Framework and Evidence for Peru," Boston College Working Papers in Economics 327., Boston College Department of Economics.
    3. Rosenzweig, Mark R & Stark, Oded, 1989. "Consumption Smoothing, Migration, and Marriage: Evidence from Rural India," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 97(4), pages 905-26, August.
    4. McKenzie, David & Rapoport, Hillel, 2007. "Self-selection patterns in Mexico-U.S. migration : the role of migration networks," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4118, The World Bank.
    5. Ilahi, Nadeem & Jafarey, Saqib, 1999. "Guestworker migration, remittances and the extended family: evidence from Pakistan," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 58(2), pages 485-512, April.
    6. Azzarri, Carlo & Carletto, Calogero, 2009. "Modeling migration dynamics in Albania : a hazard function approach," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4945, The World Bank.
    7. Alejandra Cox Edwards & Manuelita Ureta, 2003. "International Migration, Remittances, and Schooling: Evidence from El Salvador," NBER Working Papers 9766, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Poirine, Bernard, 1997. "A theory of remittances as an implicit family loan arrangement," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 25(4), pages 589-611, January.
    9. Gero Carletto & Benjamin Davis & Marco Stampini & Stefano Trento & Alberto Zezza, 2004. "Internal Mobility and International Migration in Albania," Working Papers 04-13, Agricultural and Development Economics Division of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO - ESA).
    10. Hoddinott, John, 1994. "A Model of Migration and Remittances Applied to Western Kenya," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 46(3), pages 459-76, July.
    11. de la Briere, Benedicte & Sadoulet, Elisabeth & de Janvry, Alain & Lambert, Sylvie, 2002. "The roles of destination, gender, and household composition in explaining remittances: an analysis for the Dominican Sierra," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(2), pages 309-328, August.
    12. Edwards, Alejandra Cox & Ureta, Manuelita, 2003. "International migration, remittances, and schooling: evidence from El Salvador," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 72(2), pages 429-461, December.
    13. Dustmann, Christian & Kirchkamp, Oliver, 2000. "The Optimal Migration Duration and Activity Choice after Re-migration," Sonderforschungsbereich 504 Publications 00-39, Sonderforschungsbereich 504, Universität Mannheim;Sonderforschungsbereich 504, University of Mannheim.
    14. Lucas, Robert E B & Stark, Oded, 1985. "Motivations to Remit: Evidence from Botswana," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 93(5), pages 901-18, October.
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