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The effect of New Zealand Superannuation eligibility age on the labour force participation of older people

Author

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  • Roger Hurnard

    () (The Treasury)

Abstract

New Zealand experienced a sharp rise in labour force participation rates among older people over the period 1991?2001. This stands in contrast to the experience of most other OECD countries where such participation rates have been in steady decline. The predominant reason for this turnaround was that the age of eligibility for New Zealand Superannuation, the universal public pension, was raised from 60 to 65 over a nine-year period. Combining an earlier reduction in eligibility age with this later policy reversal, this paper estimates the effect of public pension eligibility on the labour force participation of different age groups. The paper discusses why particular features of New Zealand?s pension system mean that the strength and rapidity of the response to a rise in eligibility age might not be repeatable in other settings.

Suggested Citation

  • Roger Hurnard, 2005. "The effect of New Zealand Superannuation eligibility age on the labour force participation of older people," Treasury Working Paper Series 05/09, New Zealand Treasury.
  • Handle: RePEc:nzt:nztwps:05/09
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    File URL: http://www.treasury.govt.nz/publications/research-policy/wp/2005/05-09/twp05-09.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Jonathan Gruber & David Wise, 2005. "Social Security Programs and Retirement around the World: Fiscal Implications, Introduction and Summary," NBER Working Papers 11290, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Queisser, Monika & Whitehouse, Edward, 2005. "Pensions at a glance: public policies across OECD countries," MPRA Paper 10907, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Jonathan Gruber & David A. Wise, 2004. "Social Security Programs and Retirement around the World: Micro-Estimation," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number grub04-1, April.
    4. Jonathan Gruber & David A. Wise, 1999. "Social Security and Retirement around the World," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number grub99-1, April.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    Cited by:

    1. Littlewood, Michael, 2014. "Ageing populations, retirement incomes and public policy: what really matters," MPRA Paper 56232, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    public pensions; labour force participation; retirement; New Zealand;

    JEL classification:

    • I38 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Government Programs; Provision and Effects of Welfare Programs
    • J26 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Retirement; Retirement Policies

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