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Multiple Referrals and Multidimensional Cheap Talk

  • Marco Battaglini

In previous work on cheap talk, uncertainty has almost always been modeled using a single-dimensional state variable. In this paper we prove that the dimensionality of the uncertain variable has an important qualitative impact on results and yields interesting insights into the "mechanics" of information transmission. Contrary to the unidimensional case, if there is more than one sender, full revelation of information in all states of nature is generically possible, even when the conflict of interest is arbitrarily large. What really matters in transmission of information is the local behavior of senders' indifference curves at the ideal point of the receiver, not the proximity of players' ideal point. Copyright The Econometric Society 2002.

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Paper provided by Northwestern University, Center for Mathematical Studies in Economics and Management Science in its series Discussion Papers with number 1295.

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Date of creation: Jul 1999
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Handle: RePEc:nwu:cmsems:1295
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  1. Paul R. Milgrom & John Roberts, 1985. "Relying on the Information of Interested Parties," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 749, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University.
  2. Vijay Krishna & John Morgan, 2001. "A Model Of Expertise," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 116(2), pages 747-775, May.
  3. Crawford, Vincent P & Sobel, Joel, 1982. "Strategic Information Transmission," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 50(6), pages 1431-51, November.
  4. Austen-Smith David, 1993. "Interested Experts and Policy Advice: Multiple Referrals under Open Rule," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 5(1), pages 3-43, January.
  5. Farrell, J. & Gibbons, R., 1989. "Cheap Talk With Two Audiences," Working papers 518, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Department of Economics.
  6. Epstein, David, 1998. "Partisan and Bipartisan Signaling in Congress," Journal of Law, Economics and Organization, Oxford University Press, vol. 14(2), pages 183-204, October.
  7. Baliga, Sandeep, 1999. "Monitoring and Collusion with "Soft" Information," Journal of Law, Economics and Organization, Oxford University Press, vol. 15(2), pages 434-40, July.
  8. Daniel Diermeier & Timothy J. Feddersen, 1998. "Information and Congressional Hearings," Discussion Papers 1236, Northwestern University, Center for Mathematical Studies in Economics and Management Science.
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