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Competitive information disclosure by multiple senders

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  • Au, Pak Hung
  • Kawai, Keiichi

Abstract

We analyze a model of competition in Bayesian persuasion in which multiple symmetric senders vie for the patronage of a receiver by disclosing information about their respective proposal qualities. We show that a symmetric equilibrium exists and is unique. We then show that as the number of senders increases, each sender discloses information more aggressively, and full disclosure by each sender arises in the limit of infinitely many senders.

Suggested Citation

  • Au, Pak Hung & Kawai, Keiichi, 2020. "Competitive information disclosure by multiple senders," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 119(C), pages 56-78.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:gamebe:v:119:y:2020:i:c:p:56-78
    DOI: 10.1016/j.geb.2019.10.002
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

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    2. Asriyan, Vladimir & Foarta, Dana & Vanasco, Victoria, 2018. "Strategic Complexity When Seeking Approval," Research Papers 3615, Stanford University, Graduate School of Business.
    3. Whitmeyer, Joseph & Whitmeyer, Mark, 2021. "Mixtures of mean-preserving contractions," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 94(C).
    4. Alvin Ang & Ser Percival Pena-Reyes, 2020. "Aid Distribution During the COVID-19 Crisis," Department of Economics, Ateneo de Manila University, Working Paper Series 202006, Department of Economics, Ateneo de Manila University.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Information transmission; Bayesian persuasion; Multiple senders;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D83 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Search; Learning; Information and Knowledge; Communication; Belief; Unawareness

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