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Technology Gap, Foreign Direct Investment, and Market Structure


  • Spiros Bougheas
  • David Greenaway
  • Kittipong Jangkamolkulchai
  • Richard Kneller


We develop and analyze an entry model that predicts that the likelihood that foreign firms enter a country increases with the productivity gap between foreign and domestic firms. The intuition is that foreign firms locate where their competitive advantage is highest and thus enter countries where their productivity is higher relative to domestic firms. We test this model using firm level data on acquisitions of British firms by foreign firms and find results that are consistent with our model’s predictions.

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  • Spiros Bougheas & David Greenaway & Kittipong Jangkamolkulchai & Richard Kneller, "undated". "Technology Gap, Foreign Direct Investment, and Market Structure," Discussion Papers 08/06, University of Nottingham, GEP.
  • Handle: RePEc:not:notgep:08/06

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Chiara Criscuolo & Ralf Martin, 2009. "Multinationals and U.S. Productivity Leadership: Evidence from Great Britain," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 91(2), pages 263-281, May.
    2. Buckley, Peter J & Casson, Mark, 1981. "The Optimal Timing of a Foreign Direct Investment," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 91(361), pages 75-87, March.
    3. Mark E. Doms & J . Bradford Jensen, 1998. "Comparing Wages, Skills, and Productivity between Domestically and Foreign-Owned Manufacturing Establishments in the United States," NBER Chapters,in: Geography and Ownership as Bases for Economic Accounting, pages 235-258 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Bruce Blonigen, 2005. "A Review of the Empirical Literature on FDI Determinants," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 33(4), pages 383-403, December.
    5. Motta, Massimo & Norman, George, 1996. "Does Economic Integration Cause Foreign Direct Investment?," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 37(4), pages 757-783, November.
    6. Glass, Amy Jocelyn, 1997. "Product Cycles and Market Penetration," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 38(4), pages 865-891, November.
    7. Eicher, Theo & Kang, Jong Woo, 2005. "Trade, foreign direct investment or acquisition: Optimal entry modes for multinationals," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 77(1), pages 207-228, June.
    8. Petit, Maria-Luisa & Sanna-Randaccio, Francesca, 2000. "Endogenous R&D and foreign direct investment in international oligopolies," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 18(2), pages 339-367, February.
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    Technology gap; FDI; entry;


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