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The Insurance Industry and Systemic Risk: Evidence and Discussion


  • Martin F. Grace


The financial market events in September 2008 seem unprecedented in modern times. While other systemically important events happened in the last thirty years affecting U.S. markets, the one month turmoil and government response is without equal. As a result, insurance industry economists have been dusting off dictionaries and looking up what systemic risk really means. Further, there are other policy analysts who are linking the insurance industry to systemic risk with a potential goal of changing the governmental level at which the entire industry is regulated. Systemic risk and the role insurers play in the market is of concern to both state regulators and Congress. This paper presents evidence regarding systemic effect of insurers and will discuss this in light of the rationale for federal regulation of the insurance industry

Suggested Citation

  • Martin F. Grace, 2010. "The Insurance Industry and Systemic Risk: Evidence and Discussion," NFI Policy Briefs 2010-PB-02, Indiana State University, Scott College of Business, Networks Financial Institute.
  • Handle: RePEc:nfi:nfipbs:2010-pb-02

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Martin F. Grace, 2009. "A Reexamination of Federal Regulation of the Insurance Industry," NFI Policy Briefs 2009-PB-02, Indiana State University, Scott College of Business, Networks Financial Institute.
    2. Dwight Jaffee, 2006. "Monoline Restrictions, with Applications to Mortgage Insurance and Title Insurance," Review of Industrial Organization, Springer;The Industrial Organization Society, vol. 28(2), pages 83-108, March.
    3. Freixas, Xavier & Parigi, Bruno M & Rochet, Jean-Charles, 2000. "Systemic Risk, Interbank Relations, and Liquidity Provision by the Central Bank," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 32(3), pages 611-638, August.
    4. Neil Doherty & Richard Phillips, 2002. "Keeping up with the Joneses: Changing Rating Standards and the Buildup of Capital by U.S. Property-Liability Insurers," Journal of Financial Services Research, Springer;Western Finance Association, vol. 21(1), pages 55-78, February.
    5. Markus K. Brunnermeier, 2009. "Deciphering the Liquidity and Credit Crunch 2007-2008," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 23(1), pages 77-100, Winter.
    6. Martin F. Grace & Robert W. Klein & Paul R. Kleindorfer, 2004. "Homeowners Insurance With Bundled Catastrophe Coverage," Journal of Risk & Insurance, The American Risk and Insurance Association, vol. 71(3), pages 351-379.
    7. Bernanke, Ben S, 1983. "Nonmonetary Effects of the Financial Crisis in Propagation of the Great Depression," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 73(3), pages 257-276, June.
    8. Martimort, David, 1999. "Renegotiation Design with Multiple Regulators," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 88(2), pages 261-293, October.
    9. Scott E. Harrington, 2009. "The Financial Crisis, Systemic Risk, and the Future of Insurance Regulation," Journal of Risk & Insurance, The American Risk and Insurance Association, vol. 76(4), pages 785-819.
    10. A. Craig MacKinlay, 1997. "Event Studies in Economics and Finance," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 35(1), pages 13-39, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Dionne, Georges & Harrington, Scott, 2017. "Insurance and Insurance Markets," Working Papers 17-2, HEC Montreal, Canada Research Chair in Risk Management.
    2. Pierre-Emmanuel Darpeix, 2015. "Systemic risk and insurance," PSE Working Papers halshs-01227969, HAL.
    3. repec:hal:wpaper:halshs-01227969 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Sharon Tennyson, 2010. "Rethinking Consumer Protection Regulation in Insurance Markets," NFI Policy Briefs 2010-PB-07, Indiana State University, Scott College of Business, Networks Financial Institute.
    5. Barnes, Michelle L., 2016. "Did life insurers benefit from TARP or regulatory forbearance during the financial crisis of 2008–2009?," Working Papers 16-24, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    6. repec:eee:riibaf:v:42:y:2017:i:c:p:224-232 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item


    Systemic Risk; Insurance Industry; American International Group (AIG);

    JEL classification:

    • G20 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - General
    • G22 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Insurance; Insurance Companies; Actuarial Studies


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