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G3 Exchange Rate Relationships: A Recap of the Record and a Review of Proposals for Change

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  • Richard H. Clarida

Abstract

This paper is a recap of G3 exchange rate relationships since the collapse of Bretton Woods and an analysis of recent proposals for changing the way the G3 countries currently conduct exchange rate policy. We seek to understand these proposals in the context of the status quo monetary policies and intervention arrangements that are likely to be pursued by the G3 central banks in the absence of any formal arrangements among their governments to limit exchange rate volatility. The advocates of the proposals for change have made their assessment of the global costs of exchange rate volatility and (their estimates) of exchange rate misalignments, especially as these apply to the emerging economies through their linkages to the global capital markets. In their view, the status quo is unacceptable, and a sustained effort to limit G3 exchange rate fluctuations would deliver benefits to the world economy that would outweigh the value that they place on any loss of monetary autonomy in the G3 that would be required to maintain such a system. The skeptics make a positive, not a normative, judgment that the sorts of proposals that are on the table will not, in practice, get around the impossible trinity' of international finance.

Suggested Citation

  • Richard H. Clarida, 1999. "G3 Exchange Rate Relationships: A Recap of the Record and a Review of Proposals for Change," NBER Working Papers 7434, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:7434 Note: IFM
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    1. Maurice Obstfeld & Kenneth S. Rogoff, 1996. "Foundations of International Macroeconomics," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262150476, January.
    2. Sam Y. Cross, 1998. "All about the foreign exchange market in the United States," Monograph, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, number 1998aatfemitu.
    3. Cumby, Robert E. & Huizinga, John, 1991. "The predictability of real exchange rate changes in the short and long run," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 3(1), pages 17-38, April.
    4. Martin Feldstein, 1999. "Self-Protection for Emerging Market Economies," NBER Working Papers 6907, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Peter B. Kenen, 1994. "Managing the World Economy: Fifty Years After Bretton Woods," Peterson Institute Press: All Books, Peterson Institute for International Economics, number 48.
    6. Kathryn Dominguez & Jeffrey A. Frankel, 1990. "Does Foreign Exchange Intervention Work?," Peterson Institute Press: All Books, Peterson Institute for International Economics, number 16.
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    Cited by:

    1. Anna Schwartz, 2000. "The Rise and Fall of Foreign Exchange Market Intervention as a Policy Tool," Journal of Financial Services Research, Springer;Western Finance Association, vol. 18(2), pages 319-339, December.
    2. Reinhart, Carmen & Reinhart, Vincent, 2000. "What does a G-3 target zone mean for emerging-market economies?," MPRA Paper 14099, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Barry Eichengreen, 2000. "Solving the Currency Conundrum," Economic Notes, Banca Monte dei Paschi di Siena SpA, vol. 29(3), pages 315-339, November.
    4. repec:spr:stmapp:v:11:y:2002:i:1:d:10.1007_bf02511445 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Carmen M. Reinhart & Vincent Raymond Reinhart, 2002. "What Hurts Emerging Markets Most? G3 Exchange Rate or Interest Rate Volatility?," NBER Chapters,in: Preventing Currency Crises in Emerging Markets, pages 133-170 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Wyplosz, Charles, 2001. "Exchange Rate Regimes: Some Lessons from Postwar Europe," CEPR Discussion Papers 2723, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    7. Gerardo Esquivel & Felipe Larrain B., 2002. "The Impact of G-3 Exchange Rate Volatility on Developing Countries," CID Working Papers 86, Center for International Development at Harvard University.
    8. Portes, Richard, 1999. "Global Financial Markets and Financial Stability: Europe's Role," CEPR Discussion Papers 2298, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    9. Kenneth N. Kuttner & Adam S. Posen, 2000. "Inflation, Monetary Transparency, and G3 Exchange Rate Volatility," Working Paper Series WP00-6, Peterson Institute for International Economics.
    10. Bofinger, Peter, 2000. "A framework for stabilizing the euro/yen/dollar triplet," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 11(2), pages 137-151, December.
    11. Clarida, Richard H., 2014. "Monetary policy in open economies: Practical perspectives for pragmatic central bankers," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 21-30.
    12. Jeffrey A. Frankel & Nouriel Roubini, 2001. "The Role of Industrial Country Policies in Emerging Market Crises," NBER Working Papers 8634, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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