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Managing the World Economy: Fifty Years After Bretton Woods

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  • Peter B. Kenen

Abstract

The Group of Seven major industrial democracies, at their Naples summit in July 1994, decided to consider "What framework of institutions will be required to meet the challenges of the 21st century?" and "How can we adapt existing institutions and build new institutions to ensure the future prosperity and security of our people?" This volume presents the results of an Institute conference at which leading experts and policymakers assessed the record of the Bretton Woods regime over the past half century and the need to modernize the system now. Specific proposals are made for reforming the international monetary and trading systems, including through changes in the roles of the International Monetary Fund, GATT and the New World Trade Organization, and the World Bank. The volume also assesses the case for creating new institutional arrangements to address several issues that have recently attained greater prominence on the global agenda--investment, financial markets, the environment, and migration.

Suggested Citation

  • Peter B. Kenen, 1994. "Managing the World Economy: Fifty Years After Bretton Woods," Peterson Institute Press: All Books, Peterson Institute for International Economics, number 48.
  • Handle: RePEc:iie:ppress:48
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    Cited by:

    1. Frank Biermann & Olwen Davies & Nicolien Grijp, 2009. "Environmental policy integration and the architecture of global environmental governance," International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 9(4), pages 351-369, November.
    2. Patrick Artus & Claude Jessua, 1996. "La spéculation," Revue Économique, Programme National Persée, vol. 47(3), pages 409-424.
    3. Ghafele, Roya, 2004. "The metaphors of globalization and trade. an analysis of the language used in the World Trade Organization," MPRA Paper 37736, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Simonis, Udo E., 2002. "Global environmental governance: speeding up the debate on a world environment organization," Discussion Papers, Research Professorship Environmental Policy FS II 02-404, Social Science Research Center Berlin (WZB).
    5. Michel Aglietta, 2000. "The International Monetary Fund and the International Financial Architecture," Working Papers 2000-08, CEPII research center.
    6. Kenny, Charles J. & Moss, Todd J., 1998. "Stock markets in Africa: Emerging lions or white elephants?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 26(5), pages 829-843, May.
    7. Richard N. Cooper, 1999. "Exchange rate choices," Conference Series ; [Proceedings], Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, vol. 43(Jun), pages 99-136.
    8. Philippe Hugon, 1999. "Le « consensus de Washington » en questions," Revue Tiers Monde, Programme National Persée, vol. 40(157), pages 11-36.
    9. Anne O. Krueger, 1998. "Whither the World Bank and the IMF?," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 36(4), pages 1983-2020, December.
    10. Dominick Salvatore, 1998. "International Monetary and Financial Arrangements: Present and Future," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 9(1), pages 375-416, January.
    11. Martin Parkinson & Adam McKissack, 2003. "The IMF and the Challenge of Relevance in the International Financial Architecture," Treasury Working Papers 2003-01, The Treasury, Australian Government, revised Oct 2003.
    12. Richard H. Clarida, 1999. "G3 Exchange Rate Relationships: A Recap of the Record and a Review of Proposals for Change," NBER Working Papers 7434, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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