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National Origin and Immigrant Welfare Recipiency

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  • George J. Borjas
  • Stephen J. Trejo

Abstract

This paper explores national origin differences in the welfare recipiency of immigrants to the United States. We develop an economic model of immigration which generates implications about how welfare utilization should vary according to characteristics of the country of origin. The empirical analysis reveals that a few source country characteristics explain over two-thirds of the variance of welfare recipiency rates across national origin groups, and changes in the average source country characteristics of the foreign-born population between 1970 and 1980 can account for most of the rise in immigrant welfare use that occurred over the decade.

Suggested Citation

  • George J. Borjas & Stephen J. Trejo, 1992. "National Origin and Immigrant Welfare Recipiency," NBER Working Papers 4029, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:4029
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Stephen J. Trejo, 1992. "Immigrant Welfare Recipiency: Recent Trends And Future Implications," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 10(2), pages 44-53, April.
    2. George J. Borjas, 2021. "Self-Selection and the Earnings of Immigrants," World Scientific Book Chapters, in: Foundational Essays in Immigration Economics, chapter 4, pages 69-91, World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
    3. George J. Borjas & Stephen J. Trejo, 1991. "Immigrant Participation in the Welfare System," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 44(2), pages 195-211, January.
    4. A. D. Roy, 1951. "Some Thoughts On The Distribution Of Earnings," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 3(2), pages 135-146.
    5. Francine D. Blau, 1984. "The Use of Transfer Payments by Immigrants," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 37(2), pages 222-239, January.
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