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The Second Era of Globalization is Not Yet Over: An Historical Perspective

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  • Michael D. Bordo

The recent rise of populist anti-globalization political movements has led to concerns that the current wave of globalization that goes back to the 1870s may end in turmoil just like the first wave which ended after World War I. It is too soon to tell. The decline and then levelling off of trade and capital flows in recent years reflects the drastic decline in global real income during the Great Recession. Other factors at work include the slowing down in the growth rate of China and the reversal of the extended international supply chains developed in the 1990s, as well as increased financial regulation across the world after the crisis. This suggests either a pause in the pace of integration or more likely a slowing down, rather than a reversal.

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Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 23786.

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Date of creation: Sep 2017
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:23786
Note: DAE ME
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  1. David Autor & David Dorn & Gordon Hanson & Kaveh Majlesi, 2016. "Importing Political Polarization? The Electoral Consequences of Rising Trade Exposure," NBER Working Papers 22637, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Michel Fouquin & Jules Hugot, 2016. "Two Centuries of Bilateral Trade and Gravity data: 1827-2014," VNIVERSITAS ECONÓMICA 015129, UNIVERSIDAD JAVERIANA - BOGOTÁ.
  3. Bordo, Michael D. & Rockoff, Hugh, 1996. "The Gold Standard as a “Good Housekeeping Seal of Approval”," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 56(02), pages 389-428, June.
  4. repec:ucp:macann:doi:10.1086/690241 is not listed on IDEAS
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