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Job Creation, Small vs. Large vs. Young, and the SBA

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  • J. David Brown
  • John S. Earle
  • Yana Morgulis

Abstract

Analyzing a list of all Small Business Administration (SBA) loans in 1991 to 2009 linked with annual information on all U.S. employers from 1976 to 2012, we apply detailed matching and regression methods to estimate the variation in SBA loan effects on job creation and firm survival across firm age and size groups. The number of jobs created per million dollars of loans generally increases with size and decreases in age. The results imply that fast-growing firms (“gazelles”) experience the greatest financial constraints to growth, while the growth of small, mature firms is least financially constrained. The estimated association between survival and loan amount is larger for younger and smaller firms facing the “valley of death”.

Suggested Citation

  • J. David Brown & John S. Earle & Yana Morgulis, 2015. "Job Creation, Small vs. Large vs. Young, and the SBA," NBER Working Papers 21733, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:21733
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    9. J. David Brown & John S. Earle, 2017. "Finance and Growth at the Firm Level: Evidence from SBA Loans," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 72(3), pages 1039-1080, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Geurts, Karen & Van Biesebroeck, Johannes, 2016. "Firm creation and post-entry dynamics of de novo entrants," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 59-104.
    2. Wei Dong & Geoffrey Dunbar & Christian Friedrich & Dmitry Matveev & Romanos Priftis & Lin Shao, 2021. "Complementarities Between Fiscal Policy and Monetary Policy—Literature Review," Discussion Papers 2021-4, Bank of Canada.
    3. Matthew J. Higgins & Donald J. Lacombe & Briana S. Stenard & Andrew T. Young, 2021. "Evaluating the effects of Small Business Administration lending on growth," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 57(1), pages 23-45, June.

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • H81 - Public Economics - - Miscellaneous Issues - - - Governmental Loans; Loan Guarantees; Credits; Grants; Bailouts

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