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The Long Term Impact of Cash Transfers to Poor Families

Listed author(s):
  • Anna Aizer
  • Shari Eli
  • Joseph P. Ferrie
  • Adriana Lleras-Muney

We estimate the long-run impact of cash transfers to poor families on children's longevity, educational attainment, nutritional status, and income in adulthood. To do so, we collected individual-level administrative records of applicants to the Mothers' Pension program--the first government-sponsored welfare program in the US (1911-1935) --and matched them to census, WWII and death records. Male children of accepted applicants lived one year longer than those of rejected mothers. Male children of accepted mothers received one-third more years of schooling, were less likely to be underweight, and had higher income in adulthood than children of rejected mothers.

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File URL: http://www.nber.org/papers/w20103.pdf
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Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 20103.

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Date of creation: May 2014
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:20103
Note: CH DAE ED HE LS PE
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  7. Bound, John, 1989. "The Health and Earnings of Rejected Disability Insurance Applicants," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 79(3), pages 482-503, June.
  8. repec:pri:cheawb:case_paxson_economic_status_paper.pdf is not listed on IDEAS
  9. Currie, Janet & Cole, Nancy, 1993. "Welfare and Child Health: The Link between AFDC Participation and Birth Weight," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 83(4), pages 971-985, September.
  10. Heckman, James J., 2007. "The Economics, Technology and Neuroscience of Human Capability Formation," IZA Discussion Papers 2875, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
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  16. Akee, Randall K. Q. & Copeland, William & Keeler, Gordon & Angold, Adrian & Costello, Jane E., 2008. "Parents’ Incomes and Children’s Outcomes: A Quasi-Experiment," IZA Discussion Papers 3520, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
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  19. Douglas Almond & Janet Currie, 2011. "Killing Me Softly: The Fetal Origins Hypothesis," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 25(3), pages 153-172, Summer.
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