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Endogenous Cost-Effectiveness Analysis in Health Care Technology Adoption

  • Anupam Jena
  • Tomas Philipson

Increased health care spending has been argued to be largely due to technological change. Cost-effectiveness analysis is the main tool used by private and public third-party payers to prioritize adoption of the new technologies responsible for this growth. However, such analysis by payers invariably reflects prices set by producers rather than resources used to produce treatments. This implies that the "costs" in cost-effectiveness assessments depend on endogenous markups which are, in turn, influenced by demand factors of patients, doctors, and payers. Reimbursement policy based on endogenous cost-effectiveness levels may therefore bear little relationship to efficient use of scarce medical resources. Using data on technology appraisals in the United Kingdom, we test for conditions under which adoption based on endogenous cost-effectiveness may lead to adoption of more inefficient treatments in terms of resource use.

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File URL: http://www.nber.org/papers/w15032.pdf
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Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 15032.

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Date of creation: Jun 2009
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Publication status: published as Journal of Health Economics Volume 32, Issue 1, January 2013, Pages 172–180 Cover image Endogenous cost-effectiveness analysis and health care technology adoption ☆ Anupam B. Jenaa, Tomas J. Philipsonb,
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:15032
Note: AG HC HE
Contact details of provider: Postal: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge, MA 02138, U.S.A.
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  1. Garber, Alan M. & Phelps, Charles E., 1997. "Economic foundations of cost-effectiveness analysis," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(1), pages 1-31, February.
  2. Joseph P. Newhouse, 1992. "Medical Care Costs: How Much Welfare Loss?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 6(3), pages 3-21, Summer.
  3. David Meltzer, 1997. "Accounting for Future Costs in Medical Cost-Effectiveness Analysis," NBER Working Papers 5946, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Garber, Alan M., 2000. "Advances in cost-effectiveness analysis of health interventions," Handbook of Health Economics, in: A. J. Culyer & J. P. Newhouse (ed.), Handbook of Health Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 4, pages 181-221 Elsevier.
  5. Jena, Anupam B. & Philipson, Tomas J., 2008. "Cost-effectiveness analysis and innovation," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(5), pages 1224-1236, September.
  6. Meltzer, David, 1997. "Accounting for future costs in medical cost-effectiveness analysis," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(1), pages 33-64, February.
  7. Johannesson, Magnus & Weinstein, Milton C., 1993. "On the decision rules of cost-effectiveness analysis," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 12(4), pages 459-467, December.
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