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Methodological Frontiers of Public Finance Field Experiments

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  • Jeffrey R. Kling

Abstract

The purpose of this article is to demonstrate how a rich array of methods can be applied to increase the relevance of field experiments in public economics. Two cross-cutting themes are important in multiple phases of the research. First, greater statistical sophistication can draw more value from a field experiment without obscuring the simple and compelling information from the differences in average outcomes of intervention and control groups. Second, the methodological frontier is interdisciplinary, drawing on knowledge and techniques developed in psychology, anthropology, and sociology that can be adapted in order to make public finance field experiments more useful.

Suggested Citation

  • Jeffrey R. Kling, 2007. "Methodological Frontiers of Public Finance Field Experiments," NBER Working Papers 12931, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:12931
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C93 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Field Experiments
    • H0 - Public Economics - - General
    • I0 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - General
    • J18 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Public Policy

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