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Housing Wealth and Retirement Timing

Author

Listed:
  • Martin Farnham

    (University of Victoria)

  • Purvi Sevak

    (Hunter College)

Abstract

We use data from the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) and the Office of Housing Enterprise Oversight to measure the effect of changes in housing wealth on retirement timing. Using cross-MSA variation in house-price movements to identify wealth effects on retirement timing, we find evidence that such wealth effects are present. According to some specifications the rate of transition into retirement increases in the presence of positive housing wealth shocks. In addition, we use data on expected age of retirement to measure the impact of housing wealth shocks on expectations about retirement timing. Using renters as a control for heterogeneity in local amenities and using individual fixed effects to control for unobserved individual heterogeneity, we find that a 10% increase in housing wealth is associated with a reduction in expected retirement age of between 3.5 and 5 months.

Suggested Citation

  • Martin Farnham & Purvi Sevak, 2007. "Housing Wealth and Retirement Timing," Working Papers wp172, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center.
  • Handle: RePEc:mrr:papers:wp172
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    Cited by:

    1. Benítez-Silva, Hugo & Eren, Selçuk & Heiland, Frank & Jiménez-Martín, Sergi, 2015. "How well do individuals predict the selling prices of their homes?," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(C), pages 12-25.
    2. Anita Ratcliffe, 2012. "Wealth Effects or Economic Barometer: Why Do House Prices Matter for Psychological Health?," Working Papers 2012014, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics.
    3. Zhechun He, 2015. "Estimating the Impact of House Prices on Household Labour Supply in the UK," Discussion Papers 15/19, Department of Economics, University of York.
    4. Fu, Shihe & Liao, Yu & Zhang, Junfu, 2016. "The effect of housing wealth on labor force participation: Evidence from China," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 59-69.
    5. Torben Andersen & Mikkel Hermansen, 2014. "Durable consumption, saving and retirement," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 27(3), pages 825-840, July.
    6. Lingxiao Zhao & Gregory Burge, 2017. "Housing Wealth, Property Taxes, and Labor Supply among the Elderly," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 35(1), pages 227-263.
    7. Richard Disney & John Gathergood, 2013. "House Prices, Wealth Effects and Labour Supply," Discussion Papers 13/02, University of Nottingham, School of Economics.
    8. Gopi Shah Goda & John B. Shoven & Sita Nataraj Slavov, 2012. "Does Stock Market Performance Influence Retirement Intentions?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 47(4), pages 1055-1081.
    9. Annamaria Lusardi & Olivia S. Mitchell, 2017. "Older Women's Labor Market Attachment, Retirement Planning, and Household Debt," NBER Chapters,in: Women Working Longer: Increased Employment at Older Ages, pages 185-215 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. James Marton & Stephen A. Woodbury, 2013. "Retiree Health Benefits as Deferred Compensation," Public Finance Review, , vol. 41(1), pages 64-91, January.
    11. Anita Ratcliffe, 2010. "Housing wealth or economic climate: Why do house prices matter for well-being?," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 10/234, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
    12. repec:red:issued:15-42 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Hui Shan, 2008. "Property taxes and elderly labor supply," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2008-51, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).

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