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Housing, consumption, and credit constraints

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  • Andreas Lehnert

Abstract

I test the credit-market effects of housing wealth shocks by estimating the consumption elasticity of house price shocks among households in different age quintiles. Younger households face faster expected income growth and hence would like to borrow more than older households. I estimate consumption elasticities from housing wealth by age quintile to be {4; 0; 3; 8; 3} percent. As predicted by theory, the youngest group has a higher elasticity of consumption than the next two age quintiles. That the consumption of the age quintile on the verge of retirement is responsive to housing wealth is also not surprising: I show that these households are likeliest to "downsize" their house and thus realize any capital gains.

Suggested Citation

  • Andreas Lehnert, 2004. "Housing, consumption, and credit constraints," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2004-63, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedgfe:2004-63
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    Cited by:

    1. Skudelny, Frauke, 2009. "Euro area private consumption: Is there a role for housing wealth effects," Working Paper Series 1057, European Central Bank.
    2. Michael F. Lovenheim & Kevin J. Mumford, 2010. "Do Family Wealth Shocks Affect Fertility Choices? Evidence from the Housing Market Boom and Bust," Purdue University Economics Working Papers 1228, Purdue University, Department of Economics.
    3. Yu-Fu Chen & Michael Funke & Aaron Mehrotra, 2017. "What Drives Urban Consumption in Mainland China? The Role of Property Price Dynamics," Pacific Economic Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 22(3), pages 383-409, August.
    4. Michael LaCour-Little & Eric Rosenblatt & Vincent Yao, 2010. "Home Equity Extraction by Homeowners: 2000-2006," Journal of Real Estate Research, American Real Estate Society, vol. 32(1), pages 23-46.
    5. Christopher D. Carroll & Misuzu Otsuka & Jiri Slacalek, 2011. "How Large Are Housing and Financial Wealth Effects? A New Approach," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 43(1), pages 55-79, February.
    6. Anthony Pennington-Cross & Souphala Chomsisengphet, 2007. "Subprime Refinancing: Equity Extraction and Mortgage Termination," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 35(2), pages 233-263, June.
    7. Michael F. Lovenheim, 2011. "The Effect of Liquid Housing Wealth on College Enrollment," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 29(4), pages 741-771.
    8. Aron, Janine & Muellbauer, John & Murphy, Anthony, 2006. "Housing wealth, credit conditions and consumption," MPRA Paper 24485, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Christopher D. Carroll & Misuzu Otsuka & Jirka Slacalek, 2006. "How Large Is the Housing Wealth Effect? A New Approach," NBER Working Papers 12746, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Chen, Yu-Fu & Funke, Michael, 2010. "Global Warming And Extreme Events: Rethinking The Timing And Intensity Of Environmental Policy," SIRE Discussion Papers 2010-48, Scottish Institute for Research in Economics (SIRE).
    11. De Veirman Emmanuel & Dunstan Ashley, 2011. "Time-Varying Returns, Intertemporal Substitution and Cyclical Variation in Consumption," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 11(1), pages 1-41, July.
    12. Salotti, Simone, 2009. "Wealth effect in the US: evidence from brand new micro-data," MPRA Paper 17732, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    13. Simone Salotti, 2012. "Wealth Effects in the US: Evidence from the Combination of Two Surveys," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 43(1), pages 67-98.
    14. John N. Muellbauer, 2007. "Housing, credit and consumer expenditure," Proceedings - Economic Policy Symposium - Jackson Hole, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, pages 267-334.
    15. Eva Sierminska & Yelena Takhtamanova, 2007. "Wealth effects out of financial and housing wealth: cross country and age group comparisons," Working Paper Series 2007-01, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco.
    16. Ashot Tsharakyan & Martin Janíčko, 2010. "The Binding Credit Constraints and the Welfare Effects of Housing Price Appreciation," Prague Economic Papers, University of Economics, Prague, vol. 2010(4), pages 359-382.
    17. Simone Salotti, 2010. "An appraisal of the wealth effect in the US: evidence from pseudo-panel data," Working Papers - Mathematical Economics 2010-06, Universita' degli Studi di Firenze, Dipartimento di Scienze per l'Economia e l'Impresa.
    18. Bhatia, Kul & Mitchell, Chris, 2016. "Household-specific housing capital gains and consumption: Evidence from Canadian microdata," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 19-33.
    19. Juan Contreras & Joseph B. Nichols, 2010. "Consumption responses to permanent and transitory shocks to house appreciation," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2010-32, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    20. Byron F. Lutz, 2008. "The connection between house price appreciation and property tax revenues," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2008-48, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    21. Li, Jieying & Zhang, Xin, 2017. "House Prices, Home Equity, and Personal Debt Composition," Working Paper Series 343, Sveriges Riksbank (Central Bank of Sweden).
    22. Kate Sabatini & Christian E. Weller, 2007. "Changes in Homeowners’ Financial Security during the Recent Housing and Mortgage Boom," Working Papers wp125, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.

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    Keywords

    Consumption (Economics) ; Housing - Prices ; Consumer credit;

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