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The Impact of Immigration on Native Workers in Australia

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Abstract

Immigration leads to a change in the supply of workers across skill groups. The resulting impact on employment and earnings of native workers is estimated using an innovative approach developed by Borjas (2003). The approach takes into account the skill differentials in the labour force and defines skill groups of workers in terms of their education and work experience. We find that an increase in the proportion of immigrants has a significant positive effect on labour market outcomes for native workers. This finding challenges widely held perceptions that immigration erodes labour market outcomes for native workers.

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  • Jaai Parasnis & Dietrich Fausten & Russell Smyth, 2006. "The Impact of Immigration on Native Workers in Australia," Monash Economics Working Papers archive-40, Monash University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:mos:moswps:archive-40
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    1. David Card & Thomas Lemieux, 2001. "Can Falling Supply Explain the Rising Return to College for Younger Men? A Cohort-Based Analysis," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 116(2), pages 705-746.
    2. Hsiao-Chuan Chang, 2004. "The Impact of Immigration on the Wage Differential in Australia," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 80(248), pages 49-57, March.
    3. Jordan Shan, 1999. "Immigration and Unemployment: New evidence from Australia and New Zealand," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(2), pages 253-260.
    4. Paul W. Miller & Leanne M. Neo, 2003. "Labour Market Flexibility and Immigrant Adjustment," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 79(246), pages 336-356, September.
    5. Addison, Thomas & Worswick, Christopher, 2002. "The Impact of Immigration on the Earnings of Natives: Evidence from Australian Micro Data," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 78(240), pages 68-78, March.
    6. George J. Borjas, 2003. "The Labor Demand Curve is Downward Sloping: Reexamining the Impact of Immigration on the Labor Market," NBER Working Papers 9755, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Chapman, Bruce & Cobb-Clark, Deborah, 1999. "A Comparative Static Model of the Relationship between Immigration and the Short-Run Job Prospects of Unemployed Residents," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 75(231), pages 358-368, December.
    8. Matthew W. Peter & George Verikios, 1996. "The Effect of Immigration on Residents' Incomes in Australia: Some Issues Reconsidered," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 29(2), pages 171-188.
    9. Harrison, David S, 1984. "The Impact of Immigration on a Depressed Labour Market: The South Australian Experience," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 60(168), pages 57-67, March.
    10. Prem J. Thapa, 2004. "On the risk of unemployment: a comparative assessment of the labour market success of migrants in Australia," Australian Journal of Labour Economics (AJLE), Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School, vol. 7(2), pages 199-229, June.
    11. George J. Borjas, 2003. "The Labor Demand Curve is Downward Sloping: Reexamining the Impact of Immigration on the Labor Market," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 118(4), pages 1335-1374.
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    Cited by:

    1. Kahanec, Martin & Zimmermann, Klaus F, 2008. "Migration, the Quality of the Labour Force and Economic Inequality," CEPR Discussion Papers 6899, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. Kifle, Temesgen, 2009. "The effect of immigration on the earnings of native-born workers: Evidence from Australia," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 38(2), pages 350-356, March.
    3. Kahanec, Martin & Zimmermann, Klaus F., 2008. "International Migration, Ethnicity and Economic Inequality," IZA Discussion Papers 3450, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Martin Kahanec & Klaus F. Zimmermann, 2008. "Migration in an Enlarged EU: A Challenging Solution?," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 849, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    5. Asadul Islam & Dietrich K. Fausten, 2008. "Skilled Immigration and Wages in Australia," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 84(s1), pages 66-82, September.
    6. Asadul Islam, 2009. "The substitutability of labor between immigrants and natives in the Canadian labor market: circa 1995," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 22(1), pages 199-217, January.
    7. Zimmermann, Klaus F. & Kahanec, Martin & Giulietti, Corrado & Guzi, Martin & Barrett, Alan & Maitre, Bertrand, 2012. "Report No. 43: Study on Active Inclusion of Migrants," IZA Research Reports 43, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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    Keywords

    Immigration; Australia; Employment; Earnings;

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