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Does ill health affect savings intentions? Evidence from SHARE

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  • Hendrik Jürges

    () (Munich Center for the Economics of Aging (MEA))

Abstract

This paper uses data from SHARE 2004 to analyze one possible causal pathway of the health-wealth gradient, namely differences in the marginal propensity to save and spend across different health states. Conditional on age and current wealth, I find weak relationships between health and the intended use of a hypothetical windfall gift as well bequest expectations. The overall effect of health on wealth through this link is positive but very small.

Suggested Citation

  • Hendrik Jürges, 2007. "Does ill health affect savings intentions? Evidence from SHARE," MEA discussion paper series 07139, Munich Center for the Economics of Aging (MEA) at the Max Planck Institute for Social Law and Social Policy.
  • Handle: RePEc:mea:meawpa:07139
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Sander, William, 1995. "Schooling and Quitting Smoking," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 77(1), pages 191-199, February.
    2. Agar Brugiavini & Tullio Jappelli & Guglielmo Weber, 2002. "The Survey on Health, Aging and Wealth," CSEF Working Papers 86, Centre for Studies in Economics and Finance (CSEF), University of Naples, Italy.
    3. James P. Smith, 1999. "Healthy Bodies and Thick Wallets: The Dual Relation between Health and Economic Status," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 13(2), pages 145-166, Spring.
    4. Duncan Thomas & Elizabeth Frankenberg, 2001. "The Measurement and Interpretation of Health in Social Surveys," Working Papers 01-06, RAND Corporation.
    5. Michael D. Hurd, 1998. "Anchoring Effects in the HRS: Experimental and Nonexperimental Evidence," NBER Technical Working Papers 0219, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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